1. Welcome to 28DaysLater.co.uk - 28DL - The UK Urban Exploring / Urban Exploration / Urbex Forums.

    Asylums and Hospitals, High Stuff, Industrial, Leisure Sites, Residential Sites, Military Sites, Mines and Quarries, ROC Posts, Theatres and Cinemas, Draining, Underground Sites, European and International Sites, Leads, Rumours and News, Kit, Clothing, Equipment, Photography and Video sections plus a lot more.

    Please feel free to browse this website as a guest. Creating an account removes some ads, allows you to post replies, start new topics and threads, and gives you access to more features including bookmarking, live chat, messaging and notification systems.

    Create an account | Login | Request new password

Report - Bass Maltings - October 2012

Discussion in 'Industrial Sites' started by Stealthstar79, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. Stealthstar79

    Stealthstar79 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2013
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Bass Maltings were built between 1903 and 1906 by Bass Ratcliff & Gretton’s chief Engineer and Architect Herbert A Couchman. The original design for the maltings complex was twice as large, with a further 8 malt houses to the south mirroring the current 8 blocks. Couchman was know for his meticulous standards and personally oversaw the entire project. 60 houses were built from the brick he rejected, testimony to his high standards.

    The maltings at Sleaford was an attempt to centralise malt production in an efficient way, making use of economies of scale and steam power for moving barley around the site. For the first few decades the site was able to produce malt far cheaper than any other, however with the advent of pneumatic malting in the 1940-50s, Sleaford fell into decline, ceasing as a maltings in 1959. Bass had first experimented with pneumatic malting in 1899 at the Plough Maltings in Burton, so in some ways Sleaford was outdated before it was even built. The maltings at Sleaford are considered Couchman’s best work, however his earlier Shobnall Maltings (1891) bears many resemblances.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

    Remove this ad by donating or subscribing.

Draft saved Draft deleted
Loading...

Users Who Have Read This Thread (Total: 0)

Share This Page

Remove this ad by creating an account and logging in