1. Welcome to 28DaysLater.co.uk - 28DL - The UK Urban Exploring / Urban Exploration / Urbex Forums.

    Asylums and Hospitals, High Stuff, Industrial, Leisure Sites, Residential Sites, Military Sites, Mines and Quarries, ROC Posts, Theatres and Cinemas, Draining, Underground Sites, European and International Sites, Leads, Rumours and News, Kit, Clothing, Equipment, Photography and Video sections plus a lot more.

    Please feel free to browse this website as a guest. Creating an account removes some ads, allows you to post replies, start new topics and threads, and gives you access to more features including bookmarking, live chat, messaging and notification systems.

    Create an account | Login | Request new password

Report - BBC Tatsfield - Engineering Measurement and Receiving Station & bunker - Surrey

Discussion in 'Other Sites' started by MarkR, Nov 23, 2013.

  1. MarkR

    MarkR 28DL Member
    Regular User

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    679
    Likes Received:
    4
    Home Page:
    Info and plans taken from: The Derelict Miscellany :: Tatsfield Receiving Station

    Further info: Tatsfield

    [​IMG]

    The Tatsfield B.B.C. Receiving and Measurement Station was established in 1929 to monitor domestic radio broadcasts and gather technical data about them to ensure that broadcasts were made on the correct frequency and to the highest possible standards. Situated on an exposed site on the North Downs chosen for its elevation and proximity to London, by 1938 the station it was also monitoring news bulletins from several European countries as well as Tokyo and New York.
    In the spring of 1939, the British government gave the go-ahead to prepare for war-time monitoring of foreign radio, leading to the formation of the B.B.C. Monitoring service. The outbreak of war in September of that year ensured that Tatsfield and its sister stations at Wood Norton in Worcestershire and later Caversham Park in Berkshire were kept busy gathering news and information.

    [​IMG]

    Wartime operations at the B.B.C. Monitoring Unit were divided into two distinct parts: "M" unit was the conventional monitoring section while "Y" unit, taken over from the military in 1940, focused on enemy propaganda. Information from monitoring foreign services fed into Britain's own propaganda channels, including the so-called 'black' stations run by the Political Warfare Executive. As a technical station, Tatsfield was not actually concerned with the content of the programmes received, which were listened to at Wood Norton. Instead, the station carried out technical measurements on the station frequency, signal strength, location and identity of the broadcasts: it swept the wavelengths continually for any changes from the norm, which would often be an indication of events taking place in or near the studios or transmitters themselves. The station also had responsibilities for locating foreign propaganda transmitters and reporting on jamming of BBC and British Government propaganda stations overseas.

    [​IMG]

    Peacetime meant a change of priorities at Broadcasting House: even during the war questions had been raised about the future of B.B.C. Monitoring and in 1947, the B.B.C. stated publicly that "the future of the Monitoring Service is now under review in the light of peacetime requirements." The budget was cut by around one third, from £430,000 to £300,000 p.a. and staffing was reduced by half. Tatsfield would be spared due to its technical role, but its foreign broadcast monitoring operations were to be greatly reduced. Shortly after this announcement, however, the descent of the 'Iron Curtain' over much of Eastern Europe and Asia saw a resurgence of interest in foreign broadcasts, augmented by the emergence of the 'Cold War' between the U.S.S.R. and the West. That year the United States Foreign Broadcast Monitoring Service approached the B.B.C. with a view to sharing information and avoiding duplication and the following year saw a formal agreement allowing full exchange of output and shared coverage of broadcasts.

    On 4 October, 1957 Tatsfield was the first receiver in the United Kingdom to detect signals from the Russian Sputnik I satellite. By 1961 the site included an array of dedicated satellite tracking aerials and covered 40 acres. Other aerials, connected to the main buildings by co-axial cables, receieved both radio and television broadcasts. Other facilities on site included a large receiving building, a small office block, thermally-controlled underground bunkers housing frequency standards apparatus and radio direction finding equipment, tennis courts, a cafeteria, a social club and a small wastewater treatment plant.

    [​IMG]

    The site is believed to have closed in in 1974 when its work was merged with that of B.B.C. Monitoring's receiving station at Crowsley Park in South Oxfordshire. The masts were removed and the site was divided between a local farmer, Post Office Telecoms and British Gas. A BT repeater station was later built on the site of the main block while all of the buildings to the rear of the site were demolished when a new gas valve compound was built down the hill to the west.

    Office Building in 1968

    [​IMG]

    Office Building in 2013

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

    Remove this ad by donating or subscribing.

Draft saved Draft deleted
Loading...

Users Who Have Read This Thread (Total: 0)

Share This Page

Remove this ad by creating an account and logging in