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Report - Beelitz Heilstätten, Germany - January '13

Discussion in 'European and International Sites' started by Xan_Asmodi, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. Xan_Asmodi

    Xan_Asmodi Cave Monster
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    Beelitz Heilstätten started life in 1898 as a sanatorium for the Berlin Worker's Health Insurance Corporation. It is a collection of 60 building that are Grade II listed with a total area of approximately 200ha.

    Built in four areas, with a railway bisecting the complex roughly east to west and a road travelling north-south. To the north of the railway line were the tuberculosis sanatoriums, and to the south were the sanatoria for the treatment of non-communicable diseases. The road running north-south marked the separation between male and females. The west side of the complex were the women's treatment centers and sanatoriums, the men had the same treatment centers and sanatoriums. Likewise as with the patients those working in the western buildings were mostly women, and those in the east were mostly men. The first phase of building took place from 1898 to 1902 under the architects Heino Schmieden and Boethke Julius (1864-1907). In the second phase from 1908 to 1910 the number of beds was increased from 600 to 1200. The architect was Fritz Schulz, who was also responsible in the third phase of construction 1926-30.

    The Hospital has a long history of military usage, with the first time being during the first world war. Among the approximately 17,500 convalescents, who were housed from 1914 to 1918, the most notable patient during this period was well know genocidal fuck head, Adolph 'monoball' Hitler. He spent two months recuperating there after losing the try not to catch super sonic lead competition at the Somme. The hospital saw the wounded from the Battle of Berlin, apparently numbering 3,000.

    At the end of WW2, the Soviet army took over the hospital, remaining there until 1995, well after unification in 1990. In December 1990 it played host to another famous Erich Honecker, before he and his wife Margot on 13 March 1991 were flown to Moscow. The Soviets withdrew in 1995 and attempts were made to privatise the complex to mixed results. Certain parts are still in use as a neurological rehab centre and a centre for people with Parkinson's disease.

    The day I turned up there was a film crew inhabiting the south east part of the complex, with the polizei sitting in their car on the road. I went for a wander until the polizei fucked off, due to the lack of time I didn't get to see nearly as much of the complex as I would have liked and as such I'm already planning my return trip to get this and other places ticked off my list.

    On my way back from my wander, I spotted some gates and went for a look. I found what appeared to be a military depot section of the hospital
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    To be perfectly honest, this seemed quite dull so I went back round to main South East complex to see what was going on.
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    The film crew were still around so I took a few photos of the front and went skulking around the rest of the complex which is a bit of an oddity. Some parts are derelict and very derped, for want of a better word. But then you have the tower, well painted new windows and full restored with EU funding.
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    Then we get back to the derps. The wash house
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    A gorgeous tiled building, unfortunately still derped but gorgeous nonetheless.
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    I hope that you won't blame me for not heading upstairs
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    Out back we have the pool, not that it'd get a good write up on Tripadvisor :rolleyes:
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    The complex used to have its own branch line, previously used for delivering coal to the cogeneration plant.
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    Unfortunately, all of the machinery has been removed :(
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    Having gotten bored with the South East site, I headed over to the South West site. A lot less fraught with no worries about film crews wandering the halls and grounds, I could take my time and relax a bit more.
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    Long corridors that look like one big word with an office in the centre
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    The rooms seemed like they would have been reasonably sized and quite well lit with large windows.
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    That was the conclusion of my visit to Beelitz, there's more than half of the complex that still needs my attention and hopefully I won't keep it waiting too long. If anyone fancies a road trip in April, I've got a few more places around the Berlin area that are on my list ;)

    As always; thanks for looking​
     

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