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Report - Cambridge Military Hospital, Maternity Wards, Aldershot, February 2014

Discussion in 'Asylums and Hospitals' started by sentinel, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. sentinel

    sentinel 28DL Regular User
    Regular User

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    Went for a little mooch around with Juicerail and The Raw.

    Gained access to the Maternity Hospital, as a member recommended this as one of the best options,
    Unfortunately we got caught by the Gurkha crack security team but only after we had finished with the maternity section of the Hospital and was heading for the Morgue.

    Brief History on the site
    The Cambridge Military Hospital (CMH) was the fifth military hospital built in Aldershot. The other four are described at the end of this article.
    The CMH was built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot.
    The building costs were approximately £45,758.
    The first patients admitted to the CMH were on Friday 18 July 1879. They either walked or were taken by cart ambulance from the Connaught Hospital.
    The title had nothing to do with the Cambridge area but came from His Royal Highness The Duke of Cambridge who was the Commander-in-Chief of the Army at the time. The Duke of Cambridge opened the CMH Aldershot in July 1879.
    The hospital was built on a hill because current clinical thinking at the time thought that the wind would sweep away any infection and clean the air.
    The hospital soon became a fully functioning hospital and was the first in the UK to receive battle casualties directly from the front of World War One.


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    Thanks for looking and as always any comments, constructive criticism or advice is always great appreciated :D
     

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