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Report - Crumlin Navigation Colliery - South Wales - March 2011

Discussion in 'Industrial Sites' started by The Lone Ranger, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. The Lone Ranger

    The Lone Ranger Safety is paramount!
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    Feb 25, 2010
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    Crumlin Navigation Colliery​



    Situated just north of the site of the old Crumlin Viaduct in the Ebbw valley, Partridge Jones & Co. Ltd. began stinking this colliery in 1907. The two shafts were completed in 1911 at a depth of 512 yards. Known locally as the Navi, it was well known for the very rich Blackvein seam, which in places reached a thickness of 18 feet.

    In 1918 the workforce numbered 356 and 525 in 1923, producing from the Black Vein seam. The Navigation employed 439 in 1945. After Nationalisation in 1947 the Navigation worked in conjunction with it's sister house-coal pit Aberbeeg South, known locally as Budd's although there is no record of it being owned by Budd and Co.

    It closed in 1967.

    The chimney stack and some of the pithead buildings are still standing, under the protection of a preservation order, the fan house is a grade 2 listed building.

    All that remains of the Crumlin Viaduct are the 2 abutments set high on the hillside, the Western one being situated just above and left the colliery; the viaduct itself was built of wrought iron in 1854-7 and survived as the highest railway viaduct in the U.K. until demolition in 1965 – it must have been an impressive sight (the colliery is just visible on the right of this image).


    My Visit

    I knew I was heading this way with work; so had a quick search to see what was in the area; there were a fair few shafts, mines and tunnels, but as I was on my own thought this looked like an interesting venue and not overdone on 28DL.

    First impressions were good; but it soon became evident that many of the buildings were empty shells damaged by time, weather, pikeys and the odd fire. The 2 most interesting buildings’ one being the vent house were secure. Anyway it was a nice mooch and the old cars added a bit of interest.

    Here’s the chimney on the upper level


    What happened to trespassers will be prosecuted?


    Morris Minor


    Within the upper buildings





    Upper level again


    Abandoned cars




    Well that’s it for the images, I did wander around the other buildings including the pink upholstery building which is set just up the hill, but didn’t think any justified a photo as they are well trashed.

    Shame the place is so trashed, but glad I paid it a visit!
    #1 The Lone Ranger, Mar 30, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2011

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