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Report - Exploring Dover 2010.

Discussion in 'Military Sites' started by urban junky, Apr 22, 2010.

  1. urban junky

    urban junky stuck in a hole...
    Regular User

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    Met up with Shadow, Jesus and Skydiver in surrey monday evening and headed off in the sun to Kent ready for a few days of exploring.

    Rolled up to Maniacs house where he kinedly let us stay for the week being he had time off work which was very good of him thanks again!

    When we arrived at his door it looked like the party had started without us music, beer and a room full of more explorers a good start to a good few days so after a long night of drinking and exploring talk i got my head down for a bit.

    Then arose the next morning with the cafe in mined and one year older!

    First up was Detached Bastion which i have been to many times on other trips but a few others had never seen it and its always worth a look if your in the area.....

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    Then on to a part of the bastion that i hadnt been before the main entrance from the road.....

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    After that we headed over to the North and South Casemates.
    The casemates were constructed in the late 1800's for accommodating the troops stationed on the hights they were also used in WW2 for storage......

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    The next morning late morning after the beer and cake i consumed the night before we headed over to Lydden spout deep shelter which i decided with out a rope i wouldnt do because it was down a cliff face and if you tripped or fell you would fall another two hundred foot to your death!

    So i explored Lydden spout plotting rooms instead which turned out really good because people have started a shrine of pictures and letters of people that were in there in the war.....

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    This plotting room had been sealed for over thirty years.
    The interior is in excellent condition and there are still some contemporary items inside.
    The walls are in pristine condition and there is very little evidence of deterioration considering the ammount of time it has been abandoned.
    Even the paint on the ventilation system is still mostly intact....

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    Then in my apinion the best underground explore in dover....

    Langdon Hole complex but i didnt have time to photograph all of it so im well up for going back just for this sometime....

    This underground communication facility was built during WW2. It takes the form of two parallel tunnels which are accessed by two stairways This deep shelter sunk into the chalk above Langdon Bay just to the east of Dover had two entrances about a hundred yards apart in a bank by a rough track well back from the cliff edge (the cutting for the railway line that used to run down to Dover Harbour many years ago). There are no signs of the entrances today. After squeezing through a small hole in the main entrance a long flight of steps led deep down into the chalk then into a quite large, for this type of shelter, series of rooms. The roofs/walls were the usual galvanized wriggley sheet metal, but with quite a lot of brick work. In one section where the chalk was exposed an inscription, 'M. Tutt Dec 1944', had been cut quite deeply into the chalk. The steps leading out of the secondary (eastern) entrance were largely missing leaving a steeply sloping chalk floor leading back to the surface.

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    And last of all the place where i fucked my knee up!!.....

    Cliffe Fort is a Royal Commission fort built in the 1860s on the edge of the marshes to protect against invasion via the Thames. A Brennan Torpedo station was added in 1890, the rails of which are still visible at low water, and was used as an anti-aircraft battery in World War II.

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    Thanks U.J
     

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