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Report - Ipswich Sugar Beet factory time cycle

Discussion in 'Industrial Sites' started by flametailedfox, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. flametailedfox

    flametailedfox 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

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    The sugar beet factory in Ipswich closed in 2001 and has been a favourable exploration by myself. Since my first visit in July 2008, I have been cataloguing the site in photographs. Sadly in January 2010, demolition work began in the site to clear it for future development (not, however, the expected Broad Meadow village which has been scrapped three times – sad really, because the plans were good…) :crazy and I decided to visit the site monthly to capture the demolition work and attempt to compare photographs of the site overtime.

    Today, only the four large sugar silos, two leaking molasses tanks, one oil tank, the water treatment tanks, the security building, and the sundries weighbridge remain as monuments to the factory’s existence. Although there is not much left, there are still interesting areas of the site which appear to be forgotten.

    I would like to thank the former security guard of the site, Dave, who helped with some of the pictures - he told me that he often visited 28dayslater and does remember some the explorers and their stunts :D

    Sorry if the pictures are still too large, I will have to adjust that! Enjoy the pictures ;)

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    The Sundries weigh bridge

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    Demolition work in January 2010, and the site revisited in July 2010

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    The former offices being demolished. I remember that the canteen was full of old documents and plans that were amazing to look at - when I revisited the site in May 2010, the new security guard brought me over here and pulled out from under the rubble all these old plans :eek: Workmen done't really care for history...

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    The factory site from the east. Already, before the rest of the demolition work in 2010, much of this site had been cleared back in 2006.

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    The chimney was pulled down in January, but sadly I just missed it... :mad:

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    The fuel tanks and pellet area... I think one of the fuel tanks caught fire when they were demolishing it :confused

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    The bulk loading office. An amazing place full of documents and sugar samples... sadly all gone. Only the weigh bridge on the ground helped link the photographs. A strong smell of molasses still lingered in the air...

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    ... I think that was why. The molasses tanks are leaking, but provide a good photo opportunity :D

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    This picture was more difficult to replicate. The railway track in the forground was the only pin-point for its location. In the distance can be seen the water processing tanks.

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    Two interesting photographs showing the carnage of the work. I don't know what the machine in the forground is. Any ideas?

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    Finally, my favourite picture of the site...
     

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