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Report - Longford Almshouses, Derbyshire, March 2016

Discussion in 'Residential Sites' started by HughieD, Mar 10, 2016.

  1. HughieD

    HughieD 28DL Regular User
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    This was a really enjoyable one. Don't think it has ever been done before and can't find any pictures of this beautifully decaying row of alms-houses anywhere on the web. Found them using the massively useful "Buildings at Risk" register. I knew they were there and what they used to look like in their heyday (see below):

    [​IMG]Longford_Almshouses by HughieDW, on Flickr

    But what we were faced with when we rocked up to them after parking in the delightful Derbyshire village of Longford and headed north on a footpath in the general direction of the delightful Longford Hall. After a short walk along a very boggy footpath the alms houses presented themselves in a small coppice to the right of the footpath, hemmed in by a gushing stream to the east. Here's the history bit:

    The row of six alms-house cottages were built in the early C19 for the Cokes of Longford Hall, a 16th-century country house at Longford in the Dales district of Derbyshire. Situated in the grounds of Hall, they fell into disrepair and were abandoned in the 1960s, but the liability for them stayed with the Longford Estate. When it was sold to remove the liability, a payment was made to the Sir Robert Coke's Almshouses charity, thus maintaining a tradition of providing affordable housing that dates back to its creation by the Coke family in 1688.

    In terms of the six almshouses themselves, they are built in redbrick with stone dressings and, before their collapse, they had plain tiled roofs with brick saw-tooth, eaves band and brick-ridge chimney stacks (three in total - one per pair of cottages). The single storey dwellings had a single bay. Other notable features include door-cases of stone with staff moulded edge and panelled doors (only one remains - see below). Inside each cottage there was simple stone fireplace and bed recess.

    The Grade II Listed cottages were first placed on the "Buildings at risk Register" on 10th April 1980 and removed due to being "ruinous, beyond redemption" on 22nd August 2011to let nature take its path.

    Explored with non-member GazzaM. Here's the pictures:

    The row of alms-houses are now surrounded by trees:

    [​IMG]img3997 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    [​IMG]img3986 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    [​IMG]img3972 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    [​IMG]img3975 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    [​IMG]img3998 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    The one and only door that remains:

    [​IMG]img3964 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Window that needs a bit of work!

    [​IMG]img4005 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Door and window of one cottage:

    [​IMG]img3980 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    And another that still has its stone lintel in place

    [​IMG]img3967 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    This smaller window has a more standard brick arch:

    [​IMG]img3976 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Here's the old range in one cottage;

    [​IMG]img3977 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    And another:

    [​IMG]img3984 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    This one has less left:

    [​IMG]img3978 by HughieDW, on Flickr
    [​IMG]img3993 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    [​IMG]img3990 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    The end cottage is the worst-for-wear:

    [​IMG]img3968 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    [​IMG]img3969 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    [​IMG]img3988 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    [​IMG]img4000 by HughieDW, on Flickr
     

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  2. Lancashire lad

    Lancashire lad chief taster for costa coffee
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    looking a bit worse for wear, stil some nice charm about them and loving that old cast iron range nice one
     
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  3. WildBoyz

    WildBoyz Is this the future?
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    Some good history here. I wonder why they fell into such a state.
     
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  4. HughieD

    HughieD 28DL Regular User
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    Cheers mate. Probably due to their rural location and the fact that the demand for this type of accommodation had fallen. ..
     
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