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Report - Nocton Hall April 2012

Discussion in 'Asylums and Hospitals' started by Midnightman, Apr 2, 2012.

  1. Midnightman

    Midnightman Lets find out!
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    This hasnt been done for few months so heres my report attempt on this.

    Nocton Hall is a historic listed building in the village of Nocton, in Lincolnshire, England. Originally constructed for the Ellys family, it burnt down in 1834 and was rebuilt in 1841 for the first Earl of Ripon, who lived at the steward's house in Nocton while the house was being built. The US Army's 7th General Hospital was based at Nocton Hall during World War Two.

    There is a famous chestnut tree outside which is so old it needs wooden supports. It was planted by the fifth of King Henry VIII's wives, Katherine Howard on a visit to Nocton on 13 October 1541. They stayed with Thomas Wymbishe at a manor house where Nocton Priory stood later, both of which have no visible remains. This manor came into the ownership of the Towneley family of Lancashire from 1553 to 1661. Upon his death, it was inherited by Thomas’ sister Francis, the wife of Sir Richard Towneley. It then followed the inheritance of the main Towneley Estate, until its sale by Richard Towneley (who was born there) to pay fines relating to the family’s royalist support in the English Civil War.

    In 1834 the hall suffered a fire and was rebuilt by Robert Hobart, Secretary of State (after whom the capital of Tasmania was named).

    In 1940 with the outbreak of WW2 it was taken over by the Air Ministry, remaining an RAF hospital until its closure in 1983.

    In the mid 1980s Torrie Richardson bought Nocton Hall, the surrounding wood, woodland, grassland and cottages. Selling the cottages on for redevelopment allowed him to develop Nocton Hall as a Residential Home. Nocton Hall Residential home ran a summer fête for the village on their lawn and employed many local people. Torrie's son, Gary, took control of the business in the early 1990s. The home ran into difficulty and closed in the mid 1990s, and was sold by the receivers to new owners, Leda Properties of Oxford.

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    Famous Tree
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    Didnt have time to pop over to Hospital, saved for another day. Bumped into a local lady and her daughter, they told me they have put new roofs on some of the hospital close to the back road and doesnt know why, maybe reception for soft/paint balling, anwsers on a postcard please!

    Thanks for looking
     

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