1. Welcome to 28DaysLater.co.uk - 28DL - The UK Urban Exploring / Urban Exploration / Urbex Forums.

    Asylums and Hospitals, High Stuff, Industrial, Leisure Sites, Residential Sites, Military Sites, Mines and Quarries, ROC Posts, Theatres and Cinemas, Draining, Underground Sites, European and International Sites, Leads, Rumours and News, Kit, Clothing, Equipment, Photography and Video sections plus a lot more.

    Please feel free to browse this website as a guest. Creating an account removes some ads, allows you to post replies, start new topics and threads, and gives you access to more features including bookmarking, live chat, messaging and notification systems.

    Create an account | Login | Request new password

Report - Selly Oak Hospital, mortuary buildings and rooftop, feb 16

Discussion in 'Asylums and Hospitals' started by jellyfish, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. jellyfish

    jellyfish 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    42
    Home Page:
    Hiya all. I know this has been done many times here on 28days, but iv been wanting to get in this part of the hospital for a long time and have been on the receiving end of many a fail until now :-)

    History Wikipedia

    The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King’s Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601.[1]
    The rising costs of poor relief had become a national problem and the new act sought to address this. Throughout the country, parishes were formed into larger unions with the power to raise money from rates on property to pay for the poor. King’s Norton Poor Law Union was formed from the parishes of Harborne, Edgbaston, King’s Norton, Northfield and Beoley. Each of these five parishes had individual workhouses.
    These were replaced in 1872 by the new, much larger one at Selly Oak. It was built to accommodate 200 pauper inmates. Central supervision by the Poor Law Commissioners in London ensured that all workhouses were administered similarly by a set of rules and regulations. How humanely these were interpreted depended entirely upon each local board of Poor Law Guardians, who were local worthies. They were elected annually and gave their services voluntarily.
    The aim of the Poor Law Amendment Act was to deny any form of relief except through admission to the workhouse. Generally it was assumed that the able-bodied poor could find work and if they did not then they should be forced to work within the confines of the workhouse. It was thought that if conditions in the workhouse were really bad then the poor would be deterred from seeking relief. However, by the late 18th century it became apparent that the majority of workhouse inmates were the most vulnerable people in society; the young, the old, the chronic sick and the mentally ill. Various Acts of Parliament ruled that separate provision should be made for children and the mentally ill. The sick poor were to be accommodated in separate infirmary blocks. These were often built adjacent to the workhouses and were the forerunners of many great hospitals of today.
    At Selly Oak, a separate infirmary was built in 1897 at a cost of £52,000. It was the subject of much heated debate as the original estimate had been £18,000. It was a light, clean and practical building, and generally a source of much pride. The Guardians took great care and gathered information from other infirmaries to ensure that the final design, put out to a competition and won by Mr. Daniel Arkell, was up-to-date and modern.
    The Infirmary accommodated about 250 patients in eight Nightingale wards and smaller side wards and rooms. There was also provision for maternity cases. Between the two main pavilions were a central administration block, kitchens, a laundry, a water tower, doctors’ rooms and a telephone exchange. There was no operating theatre or mortuary and, in the workhouse tradition, the internal walls were not plastered, painted brick being considered good enough for the sick paupers. The workhouse and infirmary were separated by a high dividing wall and were run as separate establishments.
    The population of the King’s Norton Union increased dramatically, and in 1907 extensions to the infirmary and the workhouse made provision for the growing numbers of poor people. This doubled the size of the main hospital building. The Woodlands Nurses’ Home was built at the same time to accommodate forty nurses. A small operating room was added to the infirmary.
    There was a resident nursing staff of eight trained nurses and nineteen probationers who were supervised by the Matron. She also had responsibility for the resident female servants. The Steward managed the infirmary, governed the male servants, kept the accounts, ordered provisions, and recorded births and deaths. There was a Senior Medical Officer who attended three times a week between 11:00 and 13:00. A Resident Medical Officer attended at both the infirmary and the workhouse.
    In 1911, King’s Norton – no longer a rural area – left Worcestershire and became part of the City of Birmingham. The Birmingham Union was formed from the unions of King’s Norton, Aston and Birmingham. The King’s Norton Workhouse Infirmary was renamed Selly Oak Hospital.
    Over the next two decades facilities improved with the addition of an operating theatre, plastering of internal walls, and the introduction of physiotherapy, pathological and X-ray services. By 1929 there were seven full-time members of the medical staff, and the medical residence was built at this time.
    Attitudes to the poor changed gradually and measures to relieve poverty, such as old age pensions and National Insurance, were introduced before the First World War. By 1930, the administrative structure of the Poor Law was finally dismantled. Selly Oak Hospital and the Workhouse, renamed Selly Oak House, came under the administration of Birmingham City Council. Selly Oak House was administered separately and used for the care of the elderly chronic sick.
    Selly Oak Hospital continued to grow, new operating theatres were added in 1931, and the biochemistry and pathology laboratories opened in 1934. Nurses had been trained at Selly Oak since 1897, but it was not until 1942 that the School of Nursing was opened.
    In 1948, when the National Health Service was introduced, Selly Oak Hospital and Selly Oak House were amalgamated. Since then many changes to the site have resulted in the institution we see today.

    The explore
    As i said above, this place has been the venue for many a fail recently, not because it was locked up or heavy on the security, more down to ending up here early morning after other explores and "leaving it for another day" . Each time we ended up on the grounds of the site a little bit more has disappeared . With this in mind and a lack of interested parties, i decided that if im going to see any of it, i had to go alone and soon. I already knew what i was looking for and roughly where to find it .
    The whole place (well what remains) appears to be very open , there are some caravans parked up which looked occupied , probably secca, but no one was about so off i went.
    I was looking for the mortuary and the water tower but only managed the mortuary on this occasion due to getting a massive soaking by the rain while taking some shots off the rooftop. (the water tower is still on the cards tho).
    If you have plans to visit here, id do it quick as building work is moving along at a pace now.
    Anyway, enough of my waffle, on with the pics ......

    The pics
    Externals

    1. [​IMG]

    2. [​IMG]

    3. [​IMG]

    4. [​IMG]

    Internals
    1. [​IMG]
    should be all good in the event of fire.

    2. [​IMG]

    3. [​IMG]

    4. [​IMG] 5. [​IMG]

    6. [​IMG]

    7. [​IMG]

    8. [​IMG]

    9. [​IMG]

    10. [​IMG]

    11. [​IMG]

    12. [​IMG]

    13. [​IMG]

    On the way to the roof

    14.[​IMG] 15.[​IMG]

    15. [​IMG]

    16. [​IMG]

    17. [​IMG]

    18. [​IMG]

    19. [​IMG]

    Thanks for looking, and expect another report from me from here before its gone :-)
     

    Remove this ad by donating or subscribing.

  2. BrainL

    BrainL 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2015
    Messages:
    864
    Likes Received:
    775
    Does look like its coming down quickly that place.. bet the locals cant wait to see the back of it now :(
     
    jellyfish likes this.
  3. jellyfish

    jellyfish 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    42
    Home Page:
    I know . It's a shame really , there are some nice buildings on the site . It'd be nice if they kept the water tower , build round it and have it as a centre piece for the new houses .
     
  4. Jon6d

    Jon6d Guest
    Guest

    Great pictures and report
     
    jellyfish likes this.
  5. PopPunkJamie

    PopPunkJamie Irregular User
    Regular User

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2013
    Messages:
    435
    Likes Received:
    136
    Home Page:
    Last I heard was they're planning to keep it
     
    jellyfish likes this.
  6. jellyfish

    jellyfish 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    42
    Home Page:
    I hope they do :-)
     
  7. Bolts

    Bolts 28DL Regular User
    Regular User

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Messages:
    802
    Likes Received:
    517
    Anything in the extinguishers?? :p
     
  8. jellyfish

    jellyfish 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    42
    Home Page:
    Lol . If I'd been with my usual lot no doubt I'd have found out :-)
     
    Stan464 likes this.
Draft saved Draft deleted
Loading...

Users Who Have Read This Thread (Total: 0)

Share This Page

Remove this ad by creating an account and logging in