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Report - Selly Oak - Jan 2016

Discussion in 'Asylums and Hospitals' started by merryprankster, Jan 12, 2016.

  1. merryprankster

    merryprankster formerly oakleyframer
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    Evening Scabies and jelly spoons, hope everyones settling back into work alright. This place is on my doorstep but was never really fussed with it, as we all know its been major 2015 tour bus destination so you know what you're in for. Was kinda always saving this place for a rainy day when i fancied some exploring but couldn't be arsed to drive to far, so yeah that day came and i popped up selly oak hospital with a couple of young bloods who are new to the forum, they had been firing reports up on 28 from all sorts of old brum derps and clearly putting the effort in and getting out exploring stuff so i teamed up with them for selly oak, originally i wanted to do the river rea but needless to say what with all the rain it was a bit of a raging torrent so that's been back burnered, that word looks like bummered from where i'm sat, it shouldnt say bummered.

    the explore-
    the explore was pretty straight forward, no craziness, no swat teams, no russian mountain dog chases, not even a sniff of secca. Thank you to the lovely lady (you know who you are) who hooked me up some details on what's what access wise at the minute, pretty straight forward mooch, still plenty of nice bits left to see, a lot more than i was expecting to be honest, couldn't believe there's more to this place than a morgue!! morgue pics seems to be the only thing i've seen from the place, don't get me wrong there is a whole load of bugger all here as well but there's a few interesting bits dotted about, my fave was the bed with the leather worn off in the shape of a person and then mould has started growing through the worn material, who doesn't want to see some fungus feeding of the moisture of years of embedded human perspiration and growing in the shape of a person! fookin gross right [​IMG]

    generic wiki history

    The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King’s Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601.[1]

    The rising costs of poor relief had become a national problem and the new act sought to address this. Throughout the country, parishes were formed into larger unions with the power to raise money from rates on property to pay for the poor. King’s Norton Poor Law Union was formed from the parishes of Harborne, Edgbaston, King’s Norton, Northfield and Beoley. Each of these five parishes had individual workhouses.

    These were replaced in 1872 by the new, much larger one at Selly Oak. It was built to accommodate 200 pauper inmates. Central supervision by the Poor Law Commissioners in London ensured that all workhouses were administered similarly by a set of rules and regulations. How humanely these were interpreted depended entirely upon each local board of Poor Law Guardians, who were local worthies. They were elected annually and gave their services voluntarily.

    The aim of the Poor Law Amendment Act was to deny any form of relief except through admission to the workhouse. Generally it was assumed that the able-bodied poor could find work and if they did not then they should be forced to work within the confines of the workhouse. It was thought that if conditions in the workhouse were really bad then the poor would be deterred from seeking relief. However, by the late 18th century it became apparent that the majority of workhouse inmates were the most vulnerable people in society; the young, the old, the chronic sick and the mentally ill. Various Acts of Parliament ruled that separate provision should be made for children and the mentally ill. The sick poor were to be accommodated in separate infirmary blocks. These were often built adjacent to the workhouses and were the forerunners of many great hospitals of today.

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    Commemorative plaque recording the opening of the King's Norton Union's Infirmary at Selly Oak, on the "3rd Day of September 1897"
    At Selly Oak, a separate infirmary was built in 1897 at a cost of £52,000. It was the subject of much heated debate as the original estimate had been £18,000. It was a light, clean and practical building, and generally a source of much pride. The Guardians took great care and gathered information from other infirmaries to ensure that the final design, put out to a competition and won by Mr. Daniel Arkell, was up-to-date and modern.

    The Infirmary accommodated about 250 patients in eight Nightingale wards and smaller side wards and rooms. There was also provision for maternity cases. Between the two main pavilions were a central administration block, kitchens, a laundry, a water tower, doctors’ rooms and a telephone exchange. There was no operating theatre or mortuary and, in the workhouse tradition, the internal walls were not plastered, painted brick being considered good enough for the sick paupers. The workhouse and infirmary were separated by a high dividing wall and were run as separate establishments.

    The population of the King’s Norton Union increased dramatically, and in 1907 extensions to the infirmary and the workhouse made provision for the growing numbers of poor people. This doubled the size of the main hospital building. The Woodlands Nurses’ Home was built at the same time to accommodate forty nurses. A small operating room was added to the infirmary.

    There was a resident nursing staff of eight trained nurses and nineteen probationers who were supervised by the Matron. She also had responsibility for the resident female servants. The Steward managed the infirmary, governed the male servants, kept the accounts, ordered provisions, and recorded births and deaths. There was a Senior Medical Officer who attended three times a week between 11:00 and 13:00. A Resident Medical Officer attended at both the infirmary and the workhouse.

    In 1911, King’s Norton – no longer a rural area – left Worcestershire and became part of the City of Birmingham. The Birmingham Union was formed from the unions of King’s Norton, Aston and Birmingham. The King’s Norton Workhouse Infirmary was renamed Selly Oak Hospital.

    Over the next two decades facilities improved with the addition of an operating theatre, plastering of internal walls, and the introduction of physiotherapy, pathological and X-ray services. By 1929 there were seven full-time members of the medical staff, and the medical residence was built at this time.

    [​IMG]

    The Good Samaritan (1961), by Uli Nimptsch, in front of the Out-patients Unit at Selly Oak Hospital
    Attitudes to the poor changed gradually and measures to relieve poverty, such as old age pensions and National Insurance, were introduced before the First World War. By 1930, the administrative structure of the Poor Law was finally dismantled. Selly Oak Hospital and the Workhouse, renamed Selly Oak House, came under the administration of Birmingham City Council. Selly Oak House was administered separately and used for the care of the elderly chronic sick.

    Selly Oak Hospital continued to grow, new operating theatres were added in 1931, and the biochemistry and pathology laboratories opened in 1934. Nurses had been trained at Selly Oak since 1897, but it was not until 1942 that the School of Nursing was opened.

    In 1948, when the National Health Service was introduced, Selly Oak Hospital and Selly Oak House were amalgamated. Since then many changes to the site have resulted in the institution we see today.

    Recent developments[edit]
    The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening [2] On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall [3] and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganisation was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006.

    Selly Oak Hospital was well renowned for the trauma care it provided and had one of the best[citation needed] burns units in the country. It was also home to theRoyal Centre for Defence Medicine, which cared for injured service men and women from conflict zones, as well as training service medical staff in preparation for working in such areas. In March 2007, the Hospital was alleged to be not properly treating Iraq war veterans.[4] The hospital has also appeared in national newspapers with stories of servicemen being verbally abused in the hospital by members of the public opposed to the war.[5] There were also difficulties[clarification needed] when Jeremy Clarkson went to the hospital to give gifts to the wounded serviceman.[6] A report published by the House of CommonsDefence Select Committee blamed the allegations against the hospital on a smear campaign[7] and praised the clinical care provided to military patients.[8]




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    MOULD MAN!!!

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    thanks for looking guys, always remember to stop look and listen, always wait for the green man and always be aware of stranger danger, take it sleazy kids.
     

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  2. Speed

    Speed Got Epic?
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    I enjoyed going back and doing all the industrial side of the place that was still live last year. The place may be a turbex hot spot but most people just ignore all that while they looking for the now totally fucked morgue.
     
  3. merryprankster

    merryprankster formerly oakleyframer
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    yeah im a bit gutted all the kitchens and stuff were stripped out by the time i got around to getting here, did you have a look up the tower ? i poked my head in and gave the stairs a go, got to where they have all gone through and felt the sides of the tread going so didn't fancy ruining a nice morning, bit too much wobble on the banister to get a foot in aswell for my liking

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Speed

    Speed Got Epic?
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    Same for me actually. It was pissing it down at the teme and the rain was coming through like a river in that spot. Needs a ladder lent up there to be 'safe' I think. Wonder if there's anything lurking.
     
  5. merryprankster

    merryprankster formerly oakleyframer
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    exactly what i thought, a ladder just bridging that bit would be spot on, gota be one kicking about somewhere
     
  6. AndyK

    AndyK Behind Closed Doors
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    That staircase is a death waiting to happen. There was enough collapsing half way up the first section to put us off, and it only gets worse. You won't see me trying that one again even with a ladder!
     
  7. Chaoskit

    Chaoskit 28DL Member
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    The lounge chair looks as though a figure has been burnt into it.. Creepy.. ace pics though!
     
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  8. dweeb

    dweeb Super Moderator
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    Hard to believe it is in that state, it was a live hospital up until recency!
     
  9. Will Knot

    Will Knot 28DL Regular User
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    Yeah, very nice, like the industrial side and decay.... great report and pics :thumb
     
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  10. The Guard Dog

    The Guard Dog Will only bite a little bit... well a lot
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    I wonder how long it actually will be before the staircase is removed with the floors it leads up too... or they'll let em collapse that seems to the attitude these days
     
  11. GRONK

    GRONK 28DL Regular User
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    Nice one mate, not much appears to have changed.
     
  12. merryprankster

    merryprankster formerly oakleyframer
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    its mould luv
     
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  13. Downwardii

    Downwardii 28DL Full Member
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    I worked there until we were moved.
    I was back in the main hospital in 2011 around 10 months after the big moves and it looked a state then. Mind you it was being mothballed since they knew it would be closing so wasn't in the best condition.

    Plus the travelers also paid a visit ripping out the copper wiring and god knows how many vandals have visited over 5 years.

    Back in the days staff still worked in some areas of the sight the security was shit hot. They even used the main building to train police dogs.
     
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