1. Welcome to 28DaysLater.co.uk - 28DL - The UK Urban Exploring / Urban Exploration / Urbex Forums.

    Asylums and Hospitals, High Stuff, Industrial, Leisure Sites, Residential Sites, Military Sites, Mines and Quarries, ROC Posts, Theatres and Cinemas, Draining, Underground Sites, European and International Sites, Leads, Rumours and News, Kit, Clothing, Equipment, Photography and Video sections plus a lot more.

    Please feel free to browse this website as a guest. Creating an account removes some ads, allows you to post replies, start new topics and threads, and gives you access to more features including bookmarking, live chat, messaging and notification systems.

    Create an account | Login | Request new password

Report - Silver Jubilee Bridge Climb, Runcorn - June 2010

Discussion in 'High Stuff' started by Ojay, Jun 9, 2010.

  1. Ojay

    Ojay Admin
    Staff Member Admin

    Nov 24, 2008
    Likes Received:
    Silver Jubilee Bridge Climb, Runcorn - By Ojay.


    The Silver Jubilee Bridge crosses the River Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal at Runcorn Gap between Runcorn and Widnes in Cheshire, England. Constructed in 1958, it is a through steel arch cantilvered bridge that was officially opened on 21 July 1961 by Princess Alexandra.

    It has since been widened between 1975–77. It carries the A533 road and a cantilevered footway. The bridge is a grade II listed building.

    Picture taken from the official opening - 21 July 1961.


    The main arch is 1,082 feet (330 m) long and each side arch measures 250 feet (76 m). During its construction 720,000 rivets were used. Its height over the river bed is 285 feet (87 m) and the headroom over the ship canal is 80 feet (24 m). During its construction 5,900 tons of steel were used and 7,500 tons of concrete. The bridge requires constant repainting and for this one coat uses 6,000 imperial gallons (27,277 l) of paint. On the Runcorn side, the approach viaducts are 1,076 feet (328 m) in length, and on the Widnes side 498 feet (152 m). The cost of constructing the bridge was £2,433,000. At the time of its construction it had the third longest steel arch span in the world. It had the longest vehicular span in the country, but this record was held for only a few weeks until the Tamar Bridge was completed.

    By 2001 it was the 10th longest steel arch bridge, and at that time was just 20 centimetres (8 in) short of having Europe's largest span.

    Having travelled across this magnificent structure many times over, I often wondered about climbing it, and what the views from the top would be like...

    This is a busy thoroughfare, and no matter what time of day/night, there is a constant flow of traffic, including the Police. Oh and not forgetting the place is camered up!

    Tonight was the night, a few energy drinks later it was a case of free climb up quick, minimal exposure time on this one. One giant GULP for mankind and I was off up to the top of the bridge.

    Once up, it's difficult to stay out of sight, as it's lit up like a Christmas tree and you are visible from miles around. It seemed like forever to reach the 'high point'. Once here, I bravely got out my camera and grabbed a few shots, before packing up and getting the fook down...FAST!. :eek:

    Apologies for the picture quality, as no tripod and very windy, not to mention the constant movement.

    (Oh, and in case anyone is wondering why it's in the Members section - See Below)



    View from the top




    Handrail; I suggest you use it


    Work is currently taking place on the bridge, therefore scaffold has been erected underneath, so I figured it would be rude not to take a closer look whilst I was here.

    (WARNING - It's alarmed up, the security van came by soon after) Could actually see the infra-red beam on the camera live view, once it was too late. GTFO.





    Thanks for looking :thumb

    Remove this ad by donating or subscribing.

Draft saved Draft deleted

Users Who Have Read This Thread (Total: 0)

Share This Page

Remove this ad by creating an account and logging in