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Report - Steetly Magnesite, Hartlepool

Discussion in 'Industrial Sites' started by awwrisp, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. awwrisp

    awwrisp 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

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    What an amazing place, it closed in 2005 but by the look of it 1985.
    Dubbed by local papers a death trap.
    I have never been to a site and seen so many random people, loads of chavs, pikeys with stil saws, young chavs setting fire to things and people with shovels digging for things whilst listening to the radio, What a strange
    place. lol

    Heres the history:
    The basic idea of extracting magnesia from the sea originated in California U.S.A where by 1935 a limited output of pharmaceutical quality magnesia was being provided using oyster shells and seawater.
    Steetley’s research and development work to extract magnesia from sea water, by reacting it with dolomite instead of oyster shells.
    Hartlepool was selected as the site for the factory because of its location close to the high purity dolomite deposits at Coxhoe and the fact that the seawater was of consistent quality and free from dilution by fresh river water. It was also near the Durham coalfield which provided the fuel for the kilns.
    Refractory grade magnesia is used in the manufacture of refractory bricks, tiles and gunning materials for application in steel, cement and non-ferrous industries. Chemical grade magnesia is used in the manufacture of rubber, plastics, leather, oil, paper pulp and fertilisers.

    Onto the Pics.

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