1. Welcome to 28DaysLater.co.uk - 28DL - The UK Urban Exploring / Urban Exploration / Urbex Forums.

    Asylums and Hospitals, High Stuff, Industrial, Leisure Sites, Residential Sites, Military Sites, Mines and Quarries, ROC Posts, Theatres and Cinemas, Draining, Underground Sites, European and International Sites, Leads, Rumours and News, Kit, Clothing, Equipment, Photography and Video sections plus a lot more.

    Please feel free to browse this website as a guest. Creating an account removes some ads, allows you to post replies, start new topics and threads, and gives you access to more features including bookmarking, live chat, messaging and notification systems.

    Create an account | Login | Request new password

General - Sweyney Cliff House. Coalport (Telford)

Discussion in 'Residential Sites' started by BethRose, May 3, 2015.

  1. BethRose

    BethRose 28DL Member
    28DL Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    11
    Good afternoon everyone as you can see this is my first post on here, I have been doing Urban exploring for nearly 3 years now and want to share this gem with you.
    Sweyney house was just being refurbished when a suspicious fire broke out damaging the house in some of the main rooms. It's quite dangerous to explore with some floors missing but I don't want this house to ever be forgotten.
    Please enjoy :) 20150503_111847.jpg

    20150503_112236.jpg

    20150503_112002.jpg

    20150503_112501.jpg

    20150503_112636.jpg

    20150503_112553.jpg

    20150503_112531.jpg

    20150503_112723.jpg

    20150503_113136.jpg
    Yes that is an Arga cooker.
    20150503_113120.jpg
    20150503_112942.jpg
    20150503_112841.jpg
    20150503_113823.jpg
    20150503_114631.jpg
    Thank you :) Let me know what you think. I think she is beautiful.
     

    Attached Files:

    MrGlasses, arvensis, catch me and 6 others like this.

    Remove this ad by donating or subscribing.

  2. The Wombat

    The Wombat Mr Wombat
    Regular User

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    389
    Nice report Beth :thumb
     
    BethRose likes this.
  3. BethRose

    BethRose 28DL Member
    28DL Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    11
    Thank you very much :)
     
  4. Lavino

    Lavino 28ÐŁ ƦEGUŁλƦ U$EƦ
    Regular User

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2014
    Messages:
    1,446
    Likes Received:
    982
    Good stuff Beth keep them coming :thumb
     
    BethRose likes this.
  5. Igangaman

    Igangaman 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    16
    This house was owned by my Grandfather from about 1933 to 1958. I lived there during WW2 to about the age of 5, then for various holidays to the age of about 17. It was a wonderful house and grounds and at the time also comprised about 100 Acres of woodland I see is now called Sutton Wood, about 1 mile of fishing rights, two meadows by the river and some cottages. There was no mains power or water, but my father had built a small hydro-electric scheme before the war using the water from the pool in the woods above the house, which was fed by a spring, and had originally been the source for a large 75-ft water wheel that had been on the site. My father built the scheme with the help of a Belgian engineer call Paulus. It consisted of a Pelton wheel powered by a jet on the end of a steel pipe laid from the pool under the spring. The pool had been constructed by building a stone block retaining wall at the time of the water wheel, probably some time in the 18th Century.


    Below the house, near the old hen house in which the Pelton wheel and dynamo lived was a large greenhouse with a very old grape vine. Also below the house was a stone build wharf where barges at one time used to deliver goods of some type. The power from the dynamo was delivered to a set of large glass accumulators in a battery house on the rear right-hand side of the yard adjacent to what had been the coach house. Next to the battery house was a control room and a big paraffin powered engine which was used to top up the batteries when the water was low (in the winter) and also to drive a saw bench to cut wood for the house fires. Behind the coach house was a fully fitted saddle room on the left side of the yard.


    When I lived there my grandparents were about 60 years old and had been brought up in the last 20 years of the 19th Century. Their style of living and attitudes were very Edwardian, and now that I am also old I feel privileged to have experienced that time with them, and possibly to have absorbed some of their values. There is a lot more I could tell you about the house, land, and childhood with a Border Collie called Dash and a 410 shot gun.
     
    #5 Igangaman, Oct 26, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
  6. Tamj188

    Tamj188 28DL Member
    28DL Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ive just gone for a walk with my family and stumbled upon the house. We thought it was beautiful and really wanted to know what happened to it so i googled it and found this post, thanks for the comment Igangaman that was really interesting!
     
  7. Amy_Films

    Amy_Films 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
  8. Igangaman

    Igangaman 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    16
    The house derives its name from that of the escarpment on the opposite side of the river, which is surmounted by a strip of tall trees. I am reminded of the fact that due to this feature, the house is very cold. The amount of sunlight striking the house is reduced by the high bank and trees in winter. The boiler in the basement supplied hot water, and a little heat seeped up into the dining room, but it was necessary to have fires in all the rooms that were in use, including one in the hall. The boiler took coal, as did the enclosed fire in the hall, but most others were open and burnt wood. When coal was in short supply during the war, we dug our own from a thin seam in the woods above the pool. Keeping wood available for the fires was hard work, needing to collect fallen timber in the 100 acres of woodland.


    Before the war, my grandfather sold the standing commercial timber to a merchant in Wolverhampton. He did not cut it because of the war, but afterwards my youngest uncle returned and made a deal with the merchant to cut the timber for collection by the merchant's trucks. That was in about 1945/6. Sutton wood was not clear cut, and the remaining timber has had a further 70 years of growth, and in theory could be cut again commercially. No doubt Telford City, who I believe are the present owners, will have this in mind as they manage the facility.


    My uncle undertook the felling in the days before chain saws using two-man cross-cut saws and felling axes. He bought an ex army heavy “quad” tank recovery vehicle with which to haul the timber up the steeply sloping land and loaded the merchants skeleton wagons. I remember the stacks of cord wood which were not wanted by the merchant, but was used in the house and also sold separately.


    The house existed as a result of the high level spring in the woods above the site, which provided a source with which a water wheel could be powered. Our family thought a wheel of some kind had been there since Roman times, but the 18th century wheel was used to crush flint for the pottery in Coalport. The spring which had fed the wheel, and my father's Pelton turbine produced water constantly although somewhat less in the winter. We ran a ½-inch jet in the winter and ¾” in the summer. The pelton driven dynamo charged 110 volt bank of glass accumulators at about 5 amps. This was a very small amount, but provided some lighting and a 1 kw electric fire for my grandmother. All other lighting was by oil lamps. Oil was also used for major cooking events to supplement the old range type of cooker – later an Aga, as is seen in the pictures. Mains electricity was not laid on until the 1950s.


    When our family was there, excess water from the spring was allowed to fall down the sandstone cliff behind the house where the old wheels would have been located. The water fell into a pool at the base of the cliff, and thence down a stream and drains under the house to the river. The stream produced a wonderful crop of watercress. There is also another low level spring that feeds what we called the Lady Well, and which still runs. This spring provided water to the house, being above the roof level, and fed into two large tanks in the roof.


    The lawn in front of the house and seen in the foreground of the first picture was used for tennis parties between the wars when my uncles were 'courting'.


    There is more!
     
  9. Amy_Films

    Amy_Films 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Struggled to find this :( I kept driving past the pub....eventually taking a walk round that area but still no luck, any extra pointers? Thanks!
     
  10. Igangaman

    Igangaman 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    16
    From the Woodbridge Inn pub go across the bridge and the entrance to the drive is on the right in front of a row of cottages facing you at the foot of the hill called Brockton Bank.
     
  11. anubis

    anubis 28" Member
    Regular User

    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    19
    nice one Beth!
     
  12. anubis

    anubis 28" Member
    Regular User

    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    19
    Must be quite rare to actually have someone reply to a report saying they previously lived in the house!
    I enjoyed the history you added Igangaman.
     
  13. Chloe2cu

    Chloe2cu 28DL Member
    28DL Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Oh my goodness. I've just found this post whilst looking for history on my house. I live in THE Cottage - which is a part of the original estate. I believe it was a kind of sister house to the main one? Any history you know about here would be amazing to hear!
     
  14. Igangaman

    Igangaman 28DL Full Member
    28DL Full Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    16
    I have no information about The Cottage; it was not part of Sweyney Cliff estate when I lived there. Initially I thought you were talking about the house on the sharp corner of Brocton Bank, which was a tied cottage and part of the property. A Mr & Mrs Jones lived there and helped with the house and gardens. I have a picture postcard taken from near the Woodbridge pub, which shows your house and the bridge together with the 4 cottages at the foot of Brocton Bank. It also shows the railway buildings that stood on part of the property and which paid my grandfather a rental. The picture shows the sharp corner, but not the tied cottage. The picture is entitled 'The bridge at Coalport' and from the style I would think it was produced in the 1930s. Igangaman.
     
  15. Mr Sam

    Mr Sam 28DL Regular User
    Regular User

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2007
    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    122
Draft saved Draft deleted
Loading...

Users Who Have Read This Thread (Total: 0)

Share This Page

Remove this ad by creating an account and logging in