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Report - Toronto heights - Toronto, ON, CA

Discussion in 'European and International Sites' started by major_tom, Dec 10, 2011.

  1. major_tom

    major_tom occupy rooftops
    28DL Full Member

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    Canada's largest city is home to some of the tallest skyscrapers in North America. Besides the obvious (and unfortunately unroofable) CN Tower, lesser-known towers like the Bay Adelaide Centre and Commerce Court still crack the 700 foot (210m) mark. Recently, the rooftops of Toronto have been fertile ground for fellow photogs; Toronto has been called the best city for rooftopping in the world. It's easy to see why: a downtown core full of tall buildings and cranes (engaged in the process of making more tall buildings), the potential for fantastic, brilliantly lit nighttime cityscapes, and a certain degree of luck with roof access doors. It's a cocktail that goes down smooth every time.

    After cracking Millbrook Prison with some of Toronto's finest explorers, I went in search of a new point of view on the concrete canyons I'd been exploring at ground level for the last week. Joined by Jono and Dresden, we set our sights on the modestly tall CF Tower - a 36 floor monolith of steel and glass right smack in the middle of Toronto on Queen Street East. Past the security desk and into the elevators went the three of us, and a short vertical ride later, we were facing down the last door between us and the sky. Jono turned the handle, the catch drew back unhindered by a lock, and the magic portal was opened.

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    Three of Toronto's tallest buildings keep watch over the city; from l-r, Scotia Plaza (902 ft/275m), Bay Adelaide West (715 ft/218m), and First Canadian Place (978 ft/298m). To the right of the downtown core is the CN Tower, dwarfing the skyscrapers at more than 1800 ft (550m) high.

    From up here, perspective definitely changes. Aside from the sheer height (for reference, 465.88 ft/142m), turning all the pedestrians and streetcars below into pawns on a child's play set, there exists up here a strange kind of solitude. Toronto at ground level is a busy, sometimes frenetic environment; people rushing everywhere with something to do, drivers cutting off each other in attempts to make green lights, the sounds of rush hour traffic, music, everything. However, at this moment, on this rooftop, there were only the three of us, and for all we cared we could be the only people in the city. The only sounds up here were the occasional *whirrrrrr* from the elevator machinery nearby, the muffled soundtrack to the city below, and the rush of the wind, intensified by our present altitude. The roof was a fantastic perch, ringed by a small rail system used to carry the equipment needed to lower the window washers on their rounds. This ring of metal, as luck would have it, made an excellent place to anchor tripods.

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    Downtown Toronto was just starting to empty its buildings of cubicle dwellers, so the three of us decided to slip out among them, saying goodbye before heading off to catch subways and streetcars destined for far-flung parts of the city. Later that evening, Dresden and I headed for the famous King Edward Hotel to meet up with Hilite and pay a visit to not only the long-abandoned 17th floor ballroom, but the summit of the building itself. The King Eddy, which opened in 1903, is one of Toronto's ritziest hotels. We dressed up for the occasion, my pea coat and D's leather gloves and classy scarf passing the rich test given to us by the eyes of the front desk concierge as we walked in. We proceeded up the elevator, down a hallway to an out-of-the-way stairwell, and up another flight of stairs until we found an unlocked door to the vaunted 17th floor. We were in.

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    The King Eddy's Crystal Ballroom was last used in 1978.

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    Dresden gets up close and personal with Toronto.

    Farther up the magical staircase, another unlocked door led us to the room housing the hotel's six humming elevator motors. Yet another door, again mysteriously unlocked (I don't know why, but it seems Canadians rarely lock their roofs), let us out into the chilly Ontario night. From up here, the sleepy city still buzzed, illuminated from all sides by thousands of lights. The view from up here was simply staggering.

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    Dresden and Hilite make their way back down the magic stairwell.

    After paying a visit to the Eddy, we made tracks to a pho restaurant just inside Kensington Market. Out came big bowls of steaming broth, noodles and meat, and over these tasty midnight munchies we traded war stories, reminisced about long-demolished sites, and talked shop (all of us having some photographic pursuits). Toronto has been called the cradle of organized urban exploration, and the explorers who call this city their home are always knowledgeable about what's under the surface of their glittering metropolis. Hilite was no exception; calm, well-spoken, and with his finger on the pulse of the city, intent on getting to the bottom (or the top) of whatever urban mission he set himself on. Our conversation was laced with names like Consumers' Glass, the Royal Constellation, and the legendary Malt. Some of these places would see visits before my departure from Canada, but which to choose? Our bowls now dry of soup, Dresden and I said our goodbyes to our comrade and headed off to the subway again, retreating to the dark reaches off of Bloor Street to make our plans for the next night.

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    -30-
     

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