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Report - Urbex in Cuba: Havana Train Wrecking Yard

Discussion in 'European and International Sites' started by thirtyfootscrew, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. thirtyfootscrew

    Guest

    NOTE: this is a version of the original post on Sick Britain urbex blog.*

    I just got back from a trip to Cuba where I spent a couple of nights in Havana before going to a beach resort for a much more traditional holiday and I thought I'd share my mini-urbex outing I had in the city. *Aside from trying to get a feel for the place and doing the touristy-type things I also took a little walk with my camera during which I came across a corrugated iron enclosure, my urbex-based 6th sense made me think "hmmm... I wonder what's in there?" and I navigated round to the entrance.*

    It turned out that the yard was full of wrecked, rusted and derelict trains, most (if not all) having been made in America in Philadelphia's Baldwin Locomotive Works or the Vulcan Iron Works in Wilkes-Barre, PA. *After I spent a little while wandering around the yard the owner (or at least keeper) of the place turned up, a lovely old man who rents out the space not filled by trains for use as a car park. *The man (whose name I couldn't quite understand) spoke no English but proceeded to show me around the yard pointing our the ages on the trains, most of them seemed to have been made around 1920 but one was as old as 1873.

    Here are a handful of shots that I took in the yard...

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