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Report (Permission Visit) - Abandoned Tyneham Village - December 2019 | Other Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report (Permission Visit) Abandoned Tyneham Village - December 2019


chidgeyb94

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Had to visit this place whilst on my Christmas hols with the family was a true reminisce on how life used to be. this place has been abandoned since world war 2 and now lays on a Ministry of Defence Firing range which is only open to the public on weekends. unfortunately due to the season all entrances were obstructed but i did my best to capture what i could. if anyone has any history they would like to share about Tyneham with me i would highly appreciate it. thanks for reading and happy hunting.


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L10ydy

28DL Member
28DL Member
The village and 7,500 acres (30 km2) of surrounding heathland and chalk downland around the Purbeck Hills, were requisitioned just before Christmas 1943 by the then War Office (now MoD) for use as firing ranges for training troops. 225 people were displaced, the last person leaving a poignant notice on the church door:
Please treat the church and houses with care; we have given up our homes where many of us lived for generations to help win the war to keep men free. We shall return one day and thank you for treating the village kindly.
This measure was supposed to be temporary for the duration of World War II, but in 1948 the Army placed a compulsory purchase order on the land and it has remained in use for military training ever since. Although littered with scrap used as targets, and subject to regular shelling, the land has become a haven for wildlife as it has been free from farming and development. In 1975, after complaints from tourists and locals, the Ministry of Defence began opening the village and footpaths across the ranges at weekends and throughout August. Many of the village buildings have fallen into disrepair or have been damaged by shelling and in 1967 the then Ministry of Works pulled down the Elizabethan manor house, though the church remains intact, and has a stained-glass window by Martin Travers. The church and school house have since been preserved as museums. In 2008, Tyneham Farm was reopened to the public and conservation work there is ongoing.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyneham
 
Last edited:

chidgeyb94

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
The village and 7,500 acres (30 km2) of surrounding heathland and chalk downland around the Purbeck Hills, were requisitioned just before Christmas 1943 by the then War Office (now MoD) for use as firing ranges for training troops. 225 people were displaced, the last person leaving a poignant notice on the church door:

This measure was supposed to be temporary for the duration of World War II, but in 1948 the Army placed a compulsory purchase order on the land and it has remained in use for military training ever since. Although littered with scrap used as targets, and subject to regular shelling, the land has become a haven for wildlife as it has been free from farming and development. In 1975, after complaints from tourists and locals, the Ministry of Defence began opening the village and footpaths across the ranges at weekends and throughout August. Many of the village buildings have fallen into disrepair or have been damaged by shelling and in 1967 the then Ministry of Works pulled down the Elizabethan manor house, though the church remains intact, and has a stained-glass window by Martin Travers. The church and school house have since been preserved as museums. In 2008, Tyneham Farm was reopened to the public and conservation work there is ongoing.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyneham
absolutely fascinating thank you for sharing that with me
 

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