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Report - - Brixton Storm Relief Sewer (Breach) – London – December 2019 | UK Draining Forum | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Brixton Storm Relief Sewer (Breach) – London – December 2019


TheVicar

Loyal to the Drain
Regular User
Explored on Boxing Day with Tallginge.

The Brixton Storm Relief Sewer follows the original path of the River Effra. It begins below the Brixton Road close to the Angell Town Housing Estate. From here it runs north towards The Oval cricket ground and then west to Vauxhall where it terminates at the Thames just north of Vauxhall Bridge.

This first photo is of the Effra Sewer taken looking south in the direction of Brixton tube station.

844555



Turning around 180 degrees and this is the view: the two arches straight ahead are the beginning of the SR, during storm conditions the flow overtops the wooden boards and relieves the sewer which continues down the tunnel to the right. Just around the corner and out of sight it meets and becomes the Southern High Level Sewer #1 which joins from the left.

844556



This shot below is taken looking back from the sewer beyond the overflow junction:

844557



Here you can see the view down the right hand side arch at the beginning of the relief sewer. Cutting across the two arches from the west is the aforementioned Southern High Level Sewer #1 which is contained in an open top cast iron carrier with a gantry alongside it:

844558



The water in this initial chamber of the storm relief is quite deep and chest waders are necessary. Care has to be taken not to breach one’s waders while negotiating the narrow gap between the water and the base of the cast iron carrier above.

The problem I had at this point is that a little earlier on in the day, I had ruined my chesties on a vicious ladder which tore a nasty hole in them rendering them no more useful than a pair of wellies.

844559


844560



Tallginge passed the carrier on the left hand side, while I popped back up topside then and re-joined the tunnel shortly beyond the deep water.
These pics show the chamber from the other side with Tallginge illustrating the scale of the chamber and water depth.

844561


844562



From here we say goodbye to the beautiful brickwork as the tunnel takes the form of an 8.5ft diameter sectional concrete pipe that was constructed between 1973 and 1975.


844563


Only a hundred metres along the tunnel the ceiling drops a bit to accommodate the Southern High Level Sewer #2 which passes above here.

844564


Shortly we walk past this dodgy bit of construction where the concrete has started to spall.
A bizarre attempt at a repair sees the use of a piece of halved waste pipe attached to the protruding rebar with nylon rope!


844565



A bit further downstream and the tunnel briefly changes shape to accommodate something above. Here a worker has taken it upon himself to write a rude word on the wall.

844566


844567



Close to St. Mark’s Church in Kennington, the tunnel takes a left turn and appears to be showing a little bit of subsidence. After a bit of snaking from left to right, we reach an interesting section where the concrete tunnel ends. Here, two heavily laden catch chains sport an impressive array of wet wipes, jam rags and other nasties.


844568


844569



After climbing over the chains, there is an interesting ovoid brick and concrete chamber where the level of the drain drops away and a lovely 9ft red brick tunnel begins.
Above ground here is a stone’s throw from the Oval cricket ground.
Tallginge paused here for a little rest before performing a quick bit of ladder acrobatics!


844570


844571



Here’s a couple of photos taken looking back up the tunnel from the start of the red brick section.


844572


844573



This brick section built in 1880, features a couple of rather nice curves before straightening out and subtly changing into a most appropriate oval shaped tunnel.


844574


844575



This shot looking back upstream towards Tallginge’s torch beam does a better job of showing the change from round to oval.


844576



We pass by Vauxhall underground and bus station and head towards the end of the tunnel which is just to the north side of Vauxhall bridge. The oval tunnel curves tightly to the right by 90 degrees and it is here where any our journey ends as a large heavy iron flap prevents any further travel.

According to the map, the tunnel continues 10 metres or so beyond this flap before taking another 90 degree turn to the left. Shortly after this is the outfall to the Thames which is currently undergoing change as part of the Tideway scheme.


844577


844578


844579



The final two pics of the Effra SR outfall structure are ones I pinched from the internet.

As of last year, this structure was demolished in preparation for the construction of the Tideway interception chamber.


844580



844581




Thanks again Tallginge for another enjoyable evening of draining company. :thumb
 

tallginge

more tall than ginger tho.....
Regular User
Nice one mate, nice to see your pics from here. That jamrag washing line - remember the kaleidoscope effect we got backlighting each others pics? Hope you don't mind me adding this video to better explain....... One is regularly treated to fantastic flicker shows in drainz, more so when yer walk a little way ahead of or behind someone else with a good torch :thumb Good times again, mate, spoonz brekkie as well. Gonna miss them for a while. Was hoping to see lucky charms outlet in that last pic - never mind

 

jezzyboo

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
very good report and pics , your blessed in london having sewers as good as these and so many keep up the good work :thumb
 

TheVicar

Loyal to the Drain
Regular User
Nice one mate, nice to see your pics from here. That jamrag washing line - remember the kaleidoscope effect we got backlighting each others pics? Hope you don't mind me adding this video to better explain....... One is regularly treated to fantastic flicker shows in drainz, more so when yer walk a little way ahead of or behind someone else with a good torch :thumb Good times again, mate, spoonz brekkie as well. Gonna miss them for a while. Was hoping to see lucky charms outlet in that last pic - never mind
Cheers, yes that kaleidoscope effect is great when it happens. I never realised you had recorded my terrible singing, was a good way to finish off last year. I'd have wanted to got even more done in hindsight with this damn cusrse of a virus.

very good report and pics , your blessed in london having sewers as good as these and so many keep up the good work :thumb
Thanks, It's a good 2 hours for me to get to London but worth every bit of it for such great drainage. With this damn plague, the drains are sadly going to have to go on the back burner.
We must wait for better dayz, for the Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away. Hopefully though he'll do more of the giving with any luck.
 

Ojay

Admin
Staff member
Admin
Good to see more people giving this some attention, the overflow/interceptor junction here being one of the most overlooked drain features over the years LDN has to offer IMO ;)
 

TheVicar

Loyal to the Drain
Regular User
Good to see more people giving this some attention, the overflow/interceptor junction here being one of the most overlooked drain features over the years LDN has to offer IMO ;)
Indeed Ojay, I'd seen very few photos of this junction which is surprising considering how splendid it is. A hidden gem so to speak. :cool:
 

pastybarm

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Great pics and video, lots of my favourite flow monitoring whatdoyacallems. Are you really a man of the cloth, or is that just yer handle mate? If you are, good to meet a real life vicar with an interest in drains and related infrastructures.
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Really nice, lovely oval shaped red brick work there. I do like the brickwork, concrete, and reflections. So intricate yet fascinating. The glistening walls and the ever building waste on them makes for a strange fascination many rarely see.
 

TheVicar

Loyal to the Drain
Regular User
Great pics and video, lots of my favourite flow monitoring whatdoyacallems. Are you really a man of the cloth, or is that just yer handle mate? If you are, good to meet a real life vicar with an interest in drains and related infrastructures.
I'm not a fully paid up member of the clergy but just like the wonderful architecture of drains and sewers, I take interest in the great architecture of churches, cathedrals and other ornate places of worship.

Really nice, lovely oval shaped red brick work there. I do like the brickwork, concrete, and reflections. So intricate yet fascinating. The glistening walls and the ever building waste on them makes for a strange fascination many rarely see.
That huge oval section was a nice treat to end the exploration of the drain, I do love how something so filthy can be so beautiful at the same time. :D
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
I'm not a fully paid up member of the clergy but just like the wonderful architecture of drains and sewers, I take interest in the great architecture of churches, cathedrals and other ornate places of worship.



That huge oval section was a nice treat to end the exploration of the drain, I do love how something so filthy can be so beautiful at the same time. :D
Totally agree, and I do find these so beautiful too.
 

pastybarm

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Then you are a vicar, just of the subterranean type though:-) Not meaning to upset the politically correct crowd, but given the sewers under chinatown have an oily/fish sauce/soy sauce smell and texture, as brixton has had historically a large afro-carribean population is there a spicy srmell to this particular segment of the sewer system, much like bradford's system has a more turmeric infused colour to the "water"?
 

TheVicar

Loyal to the Drain
Regular User
Then you are a vicar, just of the subterranean type though:-) Not meaning to upset the politically correct crowd, but given the sewers under chinatown have an oily/fish sauce/soy sauce smell and texture, as brixton has had historically a large afro-carribean population is there a spicy srmell to this particular segment of the sewer system, much like bradford's system has a more turmeric infused colour to the "water"?
I don't recall the smell of the Effra sewer being different to any of the other London sewers. That is, with the exception of the Brook Green Storm Relief.
The Brook Green SR, which despite being a Storm Relief, has a constant flow during dry weather and is particularly shitty and stinky. It's as if it only conveys the contents from toilets rather than all wastewater.
 

Rosary_Boy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Explored on Boxing Day with Tallginge.

The Brixton Storm Relief Sewer follows the original path of the River Effra. It begins below the Brixton Road close to the Angell Town Housing Estate. From here it runs north towards The Oval cricket ground and then west to Vauxhall where it terminates at the Thames just north of Vauxhall Bridge.

This first photo is of the Effra Sewer taken looking south in the direction of Brixton tube station.

View attachment 844555


Turning around 180 degrees and this is the view: the two arches straight ahead are the beginning of the SR, during storm conditions the flow overtops the wooden boards and relieves the sewer which continues down the tunnel to the right. Just around the corner and out of sight it meets and becomes the Southern High Level Sewer #1 which joins from the left.

View attachment 844556


This shot below is taken looking back from the sewer beyond the overflow junction:

View attachment 844557


Here you can see the view down the right hand side arch at the beginning of the relief sewer. Cutting across the two arches from the west is the aforementioned Southern High Level Sewer #1 which is contained in an open top cast iron carrier with a gantry alongside it:

View attachment 844558


The water in this initial chamber of the storm relief is quite deep and chest waders are necessary. Care has to be taken not to breach one’s waders while negotiating the narrow gap between the water and the base of the cast iron carrier above.

The problem I had at this point is that a little earlier on in the day, I had ruined my chesties on a vicious ladder which tore a nasty hole in them rendering them no more useful than a pair of wellies.

View attachment 844559

View attachment 844560


Tallginge passed the carrier on the left hand side, while I popped back up topside then and re-joined the tunnel shortly beyond the deep water.
These pics show the chamber from the other side with Tallginge illustrating the scale of the chamber and water depth.

View attachment 844561

View attachment 844562


From here we say goodbye to the beautiful brickwork as the tunnel takes the form of an 8.5ft diameter sectional concrete pipe that was constructed between 1973 and 1975.


View attachment 844563

Only a hundred metres along the tunnel the ceiling drops a bit to accommodate the Southern High Level Sewer #2 which passes above here.

View attachment 844564

Shortly we walk past this dodgy bit of construction where the concrete has started to spall.
A bizarre attempt at a repair sees the use of a piece of halved waste pipe attached to the protruding rebar with nylon rope!


View attachment 844565


A bit further downstream and the tunnel briefly changes shape to accommodate something above. Here a worker has taken it upon himself to write a rude word on the wall.

View attachment 844566

View attachment 844567


Close to St. Mark’s Church in Kennington, the tunnel takes a left turn and appears to be showing a little bit of subsidence. After a bit of snaking from left to right, we reach an interesting section where the concrete tunnel ends. Here, two heavily laden catch chains sport an impressive array of wet wipes, jam rags and other nasties.


View attachment 844568

View attachment 844569


After climbing over the chains, there is an interesting ovoid brick and concrete chamber where the level of the drain drops away and a lovely 9ft red brick tunnel begins.
Above ground here is a stone’s throw from the Oval cricket ground.
Tallginge paused here for a little rest before performing a quick bit of ladder acrobatics!


View attachment 844570

View attachment 844571


Here’s a couple of photos taken looking back up the tunnel from the start of the red brick section.


View attachment 844572

View attachment 844573


This brick section built in 1880, features a couple of rather nice curves before straightening out and subtly changing into a most appropriate oval shaped tunnel.


View attachment 844574

View attachment 844575


This shot looking back upstream towards Tallginge’s torch beam does a better job of showing the change from round to oval.


View attachment 844576


We pass by Vauxhall underground and bus station and head towards the end of the tunnel which is just to the north side of Vauxhall bridge. The oval tunnel curves tightly to the right by 90 degrees and it is here where any our journey ends as a large heavy iron flap prevents any further travel.

According to the map, the tunnel continues 10 metres or so beyond this flap before taking another 90 degree turn to the left. Shortly after this is the outfall to the Thames which is currently undergoing change as part of the Tideway scheme.


View attachment 844577

View attachment 844578

View attachment 844579


The final two pics of the Effra SR outfall structure are ones I pinched from the internet.

As of last year, this structure was demolished in preparation for the construction of the Tideway interception chamber.


View attachment 844580


View attachment 844581



Thanks again Tallginge for another enjoyable evening of draining company. :thumb
Great pictures to see ;)
 

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