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Report - Canada Maltings, Saint Henri, Montreal, Quebec

Punk

Irregular Member
Regular User
#1
History

The Canada Malting complex was designed by David Jerome Spence, and was built in 1904. On the west side of the complex there are nine violet coloured silos. They are covered in treated clay tiles that were manufactured by the Barnett and Record Co. of Minneapolis. These silos are rare examples of using this technique to cover and insulate silos. The cement silos on the other side were added in the 1940s, and were used to store the barley used to produce the malt. The barley was germinated and dried in the buildings that lined Saint-Ambroise Street. The factory had an enormous output of 250,000 pounds (110,000 kg) of malt per year, and distributed it to distilleries and breweries. The closing of the Lachine Canal in 1970 forced the company to transport its malt by train only, and around 1980, the building was actually too small and the transportation costs too high, so the company abandoned the site and moved into a new malting complex located at 205 Riverside and Mill Street, Montreal. The building was then sold for $500,000 and became a soya and corn storage facility for Quonta Holding Ltd, before it was abandoned in 1989 when Canadian National ceased its rail line service to factories in this area of the canal. The ancient clay silos are now protected as part of the Lachine Canal National Historic Site. They have been so battered from both the elements and vandalism, that it is no longer possible to restore them.
Since being abandoned in 1989, the factory has been covered in graffiti on the outside as well as the inside of the building.

Explore

Within 3 hours of landing in Canada, I was in here. I spent my first two nights sleeping here, one helping set up, another partying.
This place is massive. When we returned a few days later, the 4 of us spent around 4 hours in here and only covered about 3 quarters of it. Sadly, I can see this lasting just a couple of years more before it gets knocked down, or it goes down of it's own accord. While on the rooftop we looked at the façade of the main building, and the wall is coming away at the corners.
Considering I usually prefer underground stuff, I really enjoyed this place. The rooftop is among the best I've seen, it looks over downtown Montreal and Mont Royal. This is somewhere I would return to.

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This was part of the UE gallery at UM17

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This was a conveyer to get workers to the top floors quickly and efficiently

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This is the start of 3 flights of stairs that we carried 4 sofas and 2 armchairs up. Take note of the missing hand rails.

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Local explorers have cleared pathways in the rubble, making it safer and easier to navigate when under the influence

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Nice spot for a beer

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Cheers for looking​