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Question - - Draining | UK Draining Forum | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Question - Draining



fxckexplore

We all love a good corridor shot!
28DL Full Member
#1
Hello, I’ve been exploring for a few years now visiting derelict buildings and sites across the country but beginning to gain a high intrest in the drains and underground systems (in particular in Bristol), and was wondering what advice everyone has for doing so and what is the best gear to take and how to prepare?
Any help is good help thankyou in advance
 

The Lone Ranger

Safety is paramount!
Staff member
Moderator
#2
Plenty of drainers on here, and rightfully so as some of them are stunning. They do have additional hazards though.

I'll start off with don't go near in the rain.
Carry more than one torch and spare batteries.
Be aware of sudden changes in the depth of water, a tripod is a good depth finder.
I usually try to start downstream as if I can climb up a weir or cascade I should be able to get back down if needed, nowt worse than jumping down something to find you can't get out the downstream end and can't get back up where you came from.
Be prepared to get wet, possibly trash your camera.
Underfoot there will be slippy bits, things to trip on and snag on.
Bristol you have the potential of tidal sections, so know the tides and do some research if the section could be tidal.
Drains fall into 2 sections - Culverts and Sewers, sometimes they do connect. In the main I'd be happy in a culvert without a gas monitor, a sewer you have a high potential for poor air or harfmul environments so a 4Gas monitor would be a prerequisite, and recommended in a combined as you have one chance with poor air quality, by the time you find out you could be face down in the water.
 

fxckexplore

We all love a good corridor shot!
28DL Full Member
#3
Plenty of drainers on here, and rightfully so as some of them are stunning. They do have additional hazards though.

I'll start off with don't go near in the rain.
Carry more than one torch and spare batteries.
Be aware of sudden changes in the depth of water, a tripod is a good depth finder.
I usually try to start downstream as if I can climb up a weir or cascade I should be able to get back down if needed, nowt worse than jumping down something to find you can't get out the downstream end and can't get back up where you came from.
Be prepared to get wet, possibly trash your camera.
Underfoot there will be slippy bits, things to trip on and snag on.
Bristol you have the potential of tidal sections, so know the tides and do some research if the section could be tidal.
Drains fall into 2 sections - Culverts and Sewers, sometimes they do connect. In the main I'd be happy in a culvert without a gas monitor, a sewer you have a high potential for poor air or harfmul environments so a 4Gas monitor would be a prerequisite, and recommended in a combined as you have one chance with poor air quality, by the time you find out you could be face down in the water.
Thankyou very much pal all of that information is taken on board and I’ll study every detail to get it right, the only way to learn is by doing it anyway so I’ll just see what comes in the future in respect to it
 

pastybarm

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#4
Get yourself an A-Z of your nearby area from a bookstore, start looking where streams vanish on the map pages, mark the relevant pages, and go and check out the locations, it might be nothing, but it might be something big. Good, waterproof, comfortable and protective footwear is a must. Obviously the old draining adage, no drains when it rains, let someone know where you are going, and do not go alone until you feel comfortable enough or safe enough to do so, everyone has their own view, but I think it is always better to go draining with at least one friend. If at first you don't succeed, or something is not as big or impressive as you like, don't worry, you will discover bigger and more impressive drains, and will be glad you stuck with it. Just start local and see what you turn up, before you worry about moving on to other cities or towns to find more, and have fun, enjoy what you discover and see. Hope it all goes well, and lots of articles on here, and people who I am sure will be happy to answer PM's.
 

pirate

Rum Swigger
Regular User
#6
I don’t do drains but I’d watch out for anything that could harm your health.......syringes....big poops....dead things etc
Making sure you have a good scrub before eating food.
Pictures of those plug hole/sump things scare the shite out of me....wouldn’t be a pleasant way to end your final explore
 

tallginge

more tall than ginger tho.....
Regular User
#7
In addition to the good advice already offered I'd suggest at least covering up your arms in case you do go bottom over top - even dry lookin stuff can be slippery, drains are meant to be! Whether you do stuff on your own or not, it's important you can go back the way you came - whenever or wherever you go. It's easy to get 'carried away' if you'll pardon the pun. I'd recommend starting off with dreadnaught as it's good(ish) and easy to find - expect to be down there several hours, though. The frome is ace and also easy(ish) but check the tides. The 'tide marks' on the walls should be enough to give you an idea of the trouble you're in if you get caught out. There's plenty of stuff in Bristol that hasn't been reported on, or not for a long time at least. Have fun :thumb