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Report - - Great Tew Manor House, Oxfordshire - May 2012 | Residential Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - Great Tew Manor House, Oxfordshire - May 2012

CookieRaider

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#1
Visited here with two non members, such a nice place and has to be my favourite. It's a little risky with the man and his dog who lives in the end, but if you're quiet you can get around fine, we were there for about 2 hours.

History:
G T was settled in the Anglo-Saxon era. Ælfric of Abingdon held the manor of G T by 990 and became Archbishop of Canterbury in 995. Ælfric died in 1005, leaving G T to Saint Alban's Abbey. In 1049-1052 the abbey leased G T
Leofstan, abbot, and St Albans Abbey, to Tova, widow of Wihtric, in return for 3 marks of gold and an annual render of honey; lease, for her lifetime and that of her son, Godwine, of land at Cyrictiwa, with reversion to St Albans.
In Old English toponym Cyrictiwa means "Church Tew", distinguishing the village from neighbouring Little Tew which lacked its own church, and Nether Worton which seems not to have had its own chapel until the 12th century.
William the Conqueror granted the manor to his step-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, and it was recorded amongst Odo's estates in the Domesday Book in 1086.
T G Park was created before the latter part of the 16th century.
Sir Lawrence Tanfield, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, bought G T estate in 1611 from Edward Rainsford. He deprived the villagers of timber, causing some of the cottages to fall into disrepair. Tanfield enclosed part of G Ts lands in 1622. However, most of the parish's common lands were not enclosed until Parliament passed an Enclosure Act for G T in 1767.
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After Tanfield died in 1626, followed by his wife Elizabeth in 1629, G T passed to his young son-in-lawLucius Cary, 2nd Viscount Falkland.
In the 1630s Lucius gathered a circle of writers and scholars at G T including Abraham Cowley, Ben Jonson and Edmund Waller. During the English Civil War the young Viscount fought on the Royalist side and was killed in 1643 at the First Battle of Newbury. G T remained in the Cary family until the death ofAnthony Cary, 5th Viscount of Falkland in 1694.
Viscount Cary lived in a large manor house which seems to have been built in or before the early part of the 17th century and seems to have been extended in the latter part of the 17th century. It was demolished in about 1800 but outlying structures from about 1700 including its stables, dovecote and stone gatepiers survive.
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In 1780 and 1793 G T estate was bought by George Stratton, who had made a fortune in the East India Company. He died in March 1800 and was succeeded by his son George Frederick Stratton. The manor house had evidently fallen into disrepair, as the Strattons lived in a smaller Georgian dower house slightly to the south of it and had the manor house demolished in about 1803. In 1808 George Frederick Stratton engaged the Scots botanist and garden designer John Loudon, who laid out north and south drives in G T Park and planted ornamental trees in and around the village, which today enhance its picturesque appearance.
In 1815-1816 Matthew Robinson Boulton, the son of the manufacturer Matthew Boulton of Soho, Birmingham, bought GT Estate. In 1825 Boulton added aGothic Revival library to the east end of the house, and in the middle of the 19th century the Boulton family added a large Tudor style section to the west end.]G T remained with the Boulton family until M.E. Boulton died without heirs in 1914.
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More on my flickr here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuarthomas/sets/72157629888304298/

Any feedback is welcome, thank you!
 

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