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Report - - Holdings Country Pottery, Oswaldtwistle - Jan 18 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Holdings Country Pottery, Oswaldtwistle - Jan 18



UrbandonedTeam

the north
28DL Full Member
#1
We've had our eye on this one for a long time but seen as it's in such an annoying area unless you have a car, it's took a while for us to finally make the trip.

Holding Bros Pottery



In all honesty, this is maybe the smallest place we have ever explored but because of it's location and simplicity, it is also one of my favourites. I'm very glad we ticked it off the list.

The factory was founded in 1842 by James Holding. The original pottery was built a short distance away in an outlying part of Oswaldtwistle. In 1860 the firm moved his business to Broadfield, then in 1900 his son Grimshaw Holding moved the company again to the present site.







I would maybe consider coming back to this place in the summer as I feel it would look the best. However, the trees growing and foliage adds so much, especially contrasting with all the rusty machinery. The pictures above are from the main room I see most pictures from.

Another feature of this place is the machinery. It seemed like the company had a very small employment or was just run by the family because there was a small amount of machines, one for each job. For some reason they are just left rotting behind a house, but I'm not complaining.









I'd love to know what these are for if any of you know, please leave a message. I feel like I could create a better picture of what went on inside with good knowledge of them.

Next, we entered the family living/tea shop I believe. There was a lot more retro stuff left behind but it had been thrown around a bit. I'd have loved to see this place back in it's day as it was originally left untouched, according to certain reports.

Seemed as if the many explorers that had visited this place had set up a lot of the photographs but I didn't mind..











The final part of the site is a small outer building, complete with the moulds used for the pots to be made, a stove and a beheaded sculpture.





Holdings stayed put and business passed down from father to son throughout it's decline, when it closed.

Be sure to check out the small exploration video I made on this site. Finally managed to use my slider so there is some really cool cinematic shots. Feedback would be appreciated :)


Thanks for reading :)
 

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