Web
Analytics
Report - - Lentney gun battery, Plymouth, March 2018 | Military Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Lentney gun battery, Plymouth, March 2018


HughieD

28DL Regular User
Regular User
1. The History:
Lentney Battery was built in 1905 as one of three 6-inch gun batteries to defend the Eastern approaches to Plymouth Sound, for the defence of the Royal Naval Dockyard at Devonport, 3.7 miles to the north-east. Lentney and Renney batteries were strategically placed to keep the largest enemy battleships and armoured cruisers of the pre-Dreadnought era out of range from bombarding the dockyard and ships anchored in Plymouth Sound. Originally intended to house 3 guns, only two emplacements were completed for the 6-inch Mark VII breech-loading naval guns. The magazines, ammunition prep areas and barracks were situated below the battery.

In 1911 the battery was put into reserve, as its role was better fulfilled by the contemporary battery at Watch House. In 1914 a blockhouse and unclimbable fence was added and the battery was manned by the Devonshire Royal Garrison Artillery who shared accommodation with the nearby Renney Battery to the south. The guns were dismounted after the First World War.

Lay-out of the Lentney battery:

Lentney by HughieDW, on Flickr

During the Second World War between 1939 and 1941 the battery was modernised and re-armed with similar guns (but this time the Mk24 guns included splinter boxes over the guns) as before manned by men from 156 Royal Artillery Battery. After the war the battery was used as one of the practise batteries for the Coast Artillery Training School who were based up the coast at Fort Staddon. The battery remained in usable condition until the dissolution of coast artillery in the United Kingdom in 1956 when it was once again disarmed, and the guns sold for scrap. The site was then released by the military in 1991.

Picture of the battery in 1953 three years before it was disarmed:

20180327_151907 by HughieDW, on Flickr

2. The Explore:
With time at a premium and having no car at my disposal, this was a bit of a logistical challenge getting out here. Utilising Plymouth's fantastic bus service I got as close to Fort Bovisand as I could then walked the rest of the way along the counrry back-roads. Once at Bovisand I turned left and walked along the coastal path then turned inland to reach the battery. It was a beautiful March day with bright sunlight and blue skies. It was so peaceful and the site itself remains incredibly untouched, bar the odd graff artist that has found their way here. There is still plenty to see here including the original lighting and powder/shell and cartridge hoists, making this a most enjoyable visit.

3. The Pictures:

Looks like we’re in the right place!

img5911 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Old hatch on the first gun emplacement:

img5913 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5914 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5915 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5916 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5917 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5918 by HughieDW, on Flickr

One of the original light fittings:

img5920

img5923bw by HughieDW, on Flickr

Dave and Dave’s been here!

img5927 by HughieDW, on Flickr
img5928 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5930bw by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5931 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5932 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Some interesting old electrics in here:

img5933 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Window to the world:

img5937 by HughieDW, on Flickr

What lovely ammo prep galleries:

img5938 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Some original hoist gear:

img5947 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5951 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5953 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Clean as a whistle!

img5957 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5962 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5963 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Some nice colours in this smaller room:

img5964 by HughieDW, on Flickr

And to the only room with any graff:

img5966 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5968 by HughieDW, on Flickr

img5971 by HughieDW, on Flickr

And look at this!

img5975 by HughieDW, on Flickr
 

Similar threads


Top