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Report - - Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum (St John's), Bracebridge Heath, Jan 2019 | Asylums and Hospitals | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum (St John's), Bracebridge Heath, Jan 2019


KPUrban_

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
St John's Hospital
I've been juggling weather to post this one for a little while since it has been done a fair amount since and most the images I have aren't up to scratch. I was going to head back and re-document the site again but with no obvious access and other things to do I gave up on that hope.

Anyway, a bit of history.

The asylum's inital design was by John Hamilton and James Medland of Gloucester in 1848 the plans for the asylum were soon amended following talks with Medical-Superintendent Dr Palmer who didn't agree with the design with revisions soon taking place alongside Thomas Parry, the County Surveyor of Kesteven, due for 1849. By February 1850 John R. Hamilton, the main architect, had signed the new plans and Thomas Parry agreed carry them out in the same month funding was given to the builder George Myers of Lambeth to complete construction of the new asylum.
Following construction the authorities of Lindsay, Holland, Lincoln, Stamford, Grimsby, Grantham and Kesteven managed the asylum until 1893 when Kesteven and Grantham left the union.

The asylum was built to a corridor plan (common within the 1830's to 1890's) initially holding 250 patients with the wings divided for genders, males to the West and females to the East. The 19th Century saw a mass growth for the asylum's population this meant the plans drawn up in 1857 by architect Thomas Parry were implemented far sooner than expected. The plans involved construction of another floor on the existing ground floor levels with two-storey blocks built on the ends of the east and west, the construction contracts for this extension were awarded to Young Of Burslem.

By 1872 the asylums population had nearly reached 600 patients. By 1882 construction of two new wings, deigned by FH Goddard Of Lincoln and built by W.Pattison bought the asylum capacity to 680 patients. By 1887 Dr.Palmer had retired.

Further additions were made in 1897 with the construction of six new sanitary annexes designed by FH.Goddard of Lincoln which lead to a small quarry being opened on site to provide the materials for the construction.

By 1900 the asylum held over 750 patients despite being licensed for only 680. Subsequently a major rebuilding programme was designed in 1901 by architect Albert Edward Gough of Strand, London and undertaken by builder William Brown and Son of Salford. The work set out by Gough involved heavy amounts of demolition with new structures put in places such as a large dining and recreation hall as well as new administration offices, kitchen, north entrance, as well as a new workshop yard. A new detached medical superintendents house was built to the North-West with the old one being taken over. Patient accommodation was also increased by construction two L-Shaped wings that were added to the north ends of the areas built in 1882. As well as this, following suggestions from the Commissioners of Lunacy in 1872, a long awaited isolation hospital was built to the east of the main asylum. Later in 1915 plans that had been drawn up before the war saw the extension to the female block on the south east with the same being planned for the male wing although these plans were abandoned.

In 1924 a water tower was constructed above the asylum to provide for the laundry that had been enlarged after more expansion. This can be seen in older photos of the asylum above the entrance.
Further expansion took place in 1928 after Harold S. Hall unveiled plans to build two "Cronic Blocks" that were completed in 1929. 1931 saw A.Richmond and Sons of Retford build an Admissions hospital, Gate lodge, Workshops, Engine room and Boiler house onsite.


(Information sources and Further reading: https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk https://historicengland.org.uk/ )

The Explore

The explore here was reasonably spontaneous, back when we used to have to take the train everywhere the plan was to go to Lincoln and see what we could get into. Arriving onsite a little walk and some standing around gave us the chance to jump the fence and run across the open ground in hope of a way in. Eventually an opening came into view and we were now standing in the western portion of the former hospital. Afterwards nothing spectacular really happened just a relaxed walk through the empty upper corridors and the occasional banged head or tight squeeze.

As previously mentioned the photos aren't great. I'll start with externals, a rarity for me.

A grand and slightly wonky view of the hospital in its grand Italianate architectural style.
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Right, time to go inside!
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A corridor of cell like rooms.
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Doorway to a toilet.
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Cubicles
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Another corridor with rooms perhaps for use by staff?

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Along a few more corridors gave a glimpse of the ongoing refurbishment.

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The corridor below was what I had came here for.
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More bathroom-like areas.
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Between the buildings.
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One of the older parts of the western wing.
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Eventually some navigating and careful timing of security got us into the corridor.
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Just next to it, a hall.
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Anyway, we scurried back into the main structure to keep away from the next security patrol and had a look at some seemingly more modern areas.

A large empty ward, one would assume this would have been full of beds at one point.
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A mixture of asbestos, color and architecture in this little passageway.
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A modern looking ward.
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At this point time was ticking and rain darkness was falling so we called it a day and headed home. And still missed the last train....

Anyway that's all folks.
 

Attachments

HughieD

28DL Regular User
Regular User
To be fair you got round most of the site and those pics aren't that bad at all, so well worth you posting them...
 

KPUrban_

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
To be fair you got round most of the site and those pics aren't that bad at all, so well worth you posting them...
Thank you. Still in desperate need to cover it again.
 

KPUrban_

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Nice coverage, love that corridor of metal work & crests. Always good to see. Nice peeling, nature too. Your shots are fine, nothing wrong with those. Well worth a report :thumb
 

Bugsuperstar

Irresponsible & Reckless
Regular User
I remember this place being part of a weekender and sleeping here back in 2009....ish. The late October early morning sunlight streaming into the building was something to see.

Many visits later and I’d still go back I’d say.

Good report.
 

KPUrban_

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
I remember this place being part of a weekender and sleeping here back in 2009....ish. The late October early morning sunlight streaming into the building was something to see.

Many visits later and I’d still go back I’d say.

Good report.
That sounds like a good laugh spending the night here. Saying that people are now living in certain parts now.
 

KPUrban_

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Nice coverage, love that corridor of metal work & crests. Always good to see. Nice peeling, nature too. Your shots are fine, nothing wrong with those. Well worth a report :thumb
The ironworks and crests are something of a bygone era and hopefully get a new lease of life. Thanks, photos are definitely wonky and I had to exclude about 10 of them from this report.
 

KPUrban_

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member

KPUrban_

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
This used to be local to me. Nosed around it on several occasions back in early 2000s. Good to see the pics, but can't believe it's still sitting empty to be honest. Pic below would have been around 2003 - 2004.

View attachment 884064
Wow, never realised that's how it's supposed to look!
 

Lehtz

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Wow, never realised that's how it's supposed to look!
Is the water tower still accessible? Or even still there? It was basically a giant bird nesting box on stilts. Stunk to high heaven in the top, great views though.

DSC08464.JPG
 

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