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Report - - Lock Stock & Two Smoking Barrels Sewer Overflow, Manchester - October 2010. | UK Draining Forum | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Lock Stock & Two Smoking Barrels Sewer Overflow, Manchester - October 2010.



Ojay

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#1

Lock Stock & Two Smoking Barrels, (Downstream section), Manchester

Divided into 2 sections, (Upper & Lower). Lock Stock is essentially a Victorian sewer relief system, acting as a twin CSO if you like

The setup is quite unique, but in essence provides for an overflow between the Davyhulme outfall 'A' & 'B' Trunk sewers and outfalls into the Manchester Ship Canal

Lower Lock Stock as it's commonly known was discovered by JonDoe, the upstream section has had considerably more attention than the lower

This one had eluded me for a while now after popping a few more lids, with no luck!

As the week came to a close, I was at a loose end and despite pestering various people over the weeks & months to take at look at this, nobody seemed interested :banghead

Fuck it, I'm gonna go and take another look..

After lifting another couple of lids and evading unwanted attention I soon located the access and quickly made my way down the ancient brick shaft via the rusty step irons to the overflow below

Once down into the 2.7m RBP the water was about 2 ft deep and appeared to get deeper heading downstream

I had no intention of walking down that way, as the Outfall to the ship canal provides no access

I chose wellies, and although just below breach, I still managed to get wet and covered in all manner of crap as it got deeper heading upstream

Eventually the level lowered, and interestingly appeared to be much clearer, despite the grimness of the sewer that dumps into here

As I shone my torch about I spotted a lonely frog clinging onto the brickwork yet somehow managing to evade the fresh it was somewhat cleaner than me at this point

After what seemed like an age, the RBP opened up to a huge brick chamber, ahead were the 'Two Smoking Barrels'

Although an odd looking junction, it is really quite a simple setup..

The trunk sewer flows down a 4.6m RBP, under a cast iron pipe in the left-hand tunnel and underneath the overflow chamber, bearing 90 degrees and through a second 4m cast iron pipe to the right - (See below)

The left-hand tunnel is a real oddity, having clambered across the planks of wood draped with god only knows what, and up a stepped section, I was greeted with a cast iron pipe, bolted together and running through a larger brick/concrete overflow chamber. This was raised above the sewer below

I first walked through this to grab a few shots and to work out what the hell was going on

To the left were step irons to another manhole high above, on the right were more step irons covered in all manner of shite, I headed up these and jumped across climbing ontop of the cast iron pipe to grab some further shots of the sewer as it flowed down the second cast iron pipe which can be seen cutting across the right-hand tunnel

In effect if Davyhulme 'B' overflows, the level will rise up and through the cast iron pipe, fill up the storm chamber and flow down through the tunnel on the left, down into the smaller RBP and eventually out into the ship canal - Simples!

The right tunnel is effectively a continuation of the overflow which provides for further overflow from the Davyhulme 'A' Outfall sewer (Upper Lock Stock)

Access is denied at this point, as the Davyhulme 'B' Outfall sewer cuts across from left to right through a 4m cast iron pipe, below it is a deadly sump

As I made my way out there was quite a bit of activity above ground, I sat it out for a while before eventually G.T.F.O


Overflow - 9ft RBP

1-2.jpg



Ahead, 'Two Smoking Barrels'

2-1.jpg



Left to Right 'B' & 'A' Overflows

3-1.jpg
4-4.jpg



Davyhulme 'B' main overflow chamber

5-1.jpg



Inside the cast iron pipe

6-2.jpg



Davyhulme 'B' trunk sewer

7-2.jpg



Sump

9-3.jpg



Overflow

10-4.jpg


Sewers can be cool places, but equally just as grim. Solo draining FTW :thumb
 

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