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Report - Millford Mills/ Derbyshire/ Jan 2017

The Lone Shadow

Industrial Fanatic!
28DL Full Member
#1
History
Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. The power of the Derwent was used from medieval times to run a corn-mill, dying and fulling mills, and iron and scythe forges. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper.

In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile mills constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution.
These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance.

The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son. To design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. Later, and more successful, attempts at fire-proofing are embodies in the Dyehouse building, near the bridge. Whilst almost all the early mill buildings were demolished in the 1950s and ‘60s, much of the associated industrial housing has survived. Many of these houses were built by the Strutts, from the late 18th century onwards, transforming Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. The Strutts also built the school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers, helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings.

The road bridge, with its two elegant segmental arches was opened in 1793 was principally funded by Jedediah Strutt, it was widened in 1906. The bridge carries the A6 through the village.

Milford House located on the A6 just south of Milford was built in 1792 for Jedediah Strutt. Today this building is a nursing home for elderly.
Where the Mill House public house stands today was once the site of the Mill complex built during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, it was powered by water from the Derwent channelled into a goyt. The wheel-pits may still be seen near the Mill House. It was demolished in 1964. The bell which used to hang in the Mill clock-tower can now be seen above the goyt, beside the Dyehouse just before you cross the road bridge.

The Explore
Explored here with Session9. Pulled up here mid morning and managed to get a decent parking space right outside. The tiny town of Millford seemed to have many residents walking around at this time and attempting the obvious would’ve lead to us being very exposed and would’ve probably aroused too much suspicion - So at first we did the usual thing and look for other less obvious and sometimes more interesting ways in. We ended up walking around the perimeter and climbed over a secluded wall which lead down an extremely steep bank using only trees and gravity to help us on the way down, we ended up in somebody’s garden and not being able to get any closer to the mill – It was a little frustrating but at the same time hilarious. After having climbed back up to the top of the bank all it took was a well timed manoeuvre and we were in. I really enjoyed it here; there is plenty to see, no security whatsoever and very few hazards which make for a relaxed explore. After a few hours darkness was amongst us and we made a move.

Photos

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Thanks all for viewing,

I hope you liked.

The Lone Shadow
 

Session9

A life backwards
28DL Full Member
#4
Good mooch this one L.S, nice set of snaps too mate
The pub down the road is a decent mooch too, after a hard day walking up and down vertical banks and people's gardens..
 

dave

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#5
Must admit i looked at that steep bank down to the mill and thought better of it glad i did now even more so after your attempt. Nice pics and report btw.
 

Bad monkey face

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#6
awesome photo's and report. may have too take a trip to derby/Derbyshire one day and just leave early hours an come home late if theres loads of places like this too see well done
 

ArtofDecay

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#7
We went last week, daytime, literally walked through the main gate where they do car washes, asked the car wash guy if he minds if we take some pics and casually strolled in
 

The Lone Shadow

Industrial Fanatic!
28DL Full Member
#8
Must admit i looked at that steep bank down to the mill and thought better of it glad i did now even more so after your attempt. Nice pics and report btw.
This was certainly risky - There was no guarantee that we would be able to climb back up as it was bloody steep. But of the whole explore, the entrance was both hilarious and riveting.
 

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