Web
Analytics
Report - - Old Rumsey Hall, Cornwall, CT - December 2009 | European and International Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk
  • Welcome to 28DaysLater.co.uk - 28DL - The UK Urban Exploring / Urban Exploration / Urbex Forums.

    Asylums and Hospitals, High Stuff, Industrial, Leisure Sites, Residential Sites, Military Sites, Mines and Quarries, ROC Posts, Theatres and Cinemas, Draining, Underground Sites, European and International Sites, Leads, Rumours and News, Kit, Clothing, Equipment, Photography and Video sections, plus Private & Local Groups and a lot more.

    Please feel free to browse this website as a guest. However, creating an account allows you to search, post replies, start new threads, use bookmarking, live chat, messaging and notification systems. Also, it removes some ads.

    Create an account | Login | Request new password

Report - Old Rumsey Hall, Cornwall, CT - December 2009

A

arntzville

Guest
Guest
#1
I've wanted to get into this place since I was a kid. When I was about 13 my friends and I started doing 30, 40, 50+ mile bike rides to the surrounding towns in our corner of Connecticut, and this building absolutely transfixed me as soon as I saw it. It was built in 1848 as The Alger Institute, a private boys' school, and was occupied from 1901 to 1949 by the Rumsey Hall School, which then moved to nearby Washington, CT.

Undated
1920s.jpg


Baseball team, 1921
1921.jpg


1930's postcard currently for sale on eBay that I can't quite bring myself to pay $6.50 for
1930s.jpg


It has apparently been vacant since the late 1960's, slowly deteriorating into the unsalvageable mess that it is today. It's right in the middle of Cornwall village, on the campus of the former Marvelwood School, though it doesn't seem that Marvelwood (which closed in the mid-1990s's) ever actually used it.

In 1989, a tornado ripped through this corner of Connecticut, destroying the nearby Cathedral Pines, the finest stand of 200' white pine in the country, as well as many buildings. Old Rumsey Hall had its roof mostly ripped off, and sat that way for a number of years. This was also when a number of the columns on the front of the building were blown down and subsequently stored inside (see photo 5). A private investor bought the property in 1996 and installed a tarp covering the ruined roof, but said tarp has since failed, allowing part of the roof to completely collapse into the building. All in all, the present state of the building is an atrocious tragedy; the town of Cornwall will regret not taking stronger measures to save it from demolition.

Here are a few exteriors; these are mostly 2-3 years old.

1.
01.jpg


2.
02.jpg


3.
03.jpg


4.
04.jpg


With houses right across the street and next door, and the only easy way in being blatant, it took until today, with demolition finally imminent, for me to just go ahead and do it. It was a gray, drizzly day, and I figured the local denizens wouldn't be looking out their windows; I figured I would be safe from what a British friend of mine calls "the twitchy curtain brigade."

Here's an interior shot I took through said window last Thanksgiving (2008)

5.
05.jpg


And here are the results of me finally growing some balls as a result of this news story; a demolition permit has now been applied for:
http://www.countytimes.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=20394813&BRD=2303&PAG=461&dept_id=683366&rfi=6

6. From just inside the front door
06.jpg


7.
07.jpg


8. Moss
08.jpg


9. Will they save this fireplace when demo occurs?
09.jpg


10. These doors were laid down to bridge areas of the floor that had failed. I didn't try to cross them.
10.jpg


11. Much of the building looked like a mid-demolition project.
11.jpg


12. Here is where the roof has been allowed to completely fail; photo 6 is taken from one story below.
12.jpg


13. Here is a shelf of TP, old Coke bottle, and other stuff
13.jpg


14.
14.jpg


15. Probably my favorite photo I got today
15.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator: