Web
Analytics
Report - - Osmaston Water Wheel Pump (Derbyshire, Jul, 2021) | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Osmaston Water Wheel Pump (Derbyshire, Jul, 2021)


urbanchemist

28DL Regular User
Regular User
One of the larger water wheel pumps I’ve come across.

It’s a listed structure and was probably built in the 1840s to provide water for Osmaston Manor.

The manor itself was a rambling old pile with some Liverpool connections which was eventually demolished in the 1960s, https://houseandheritage.org/2016/01/20/osmaston-manor/.

You know you’ve made it when your gaff has an elk pen.





The site of the old manor is now used as a wedding venue with views across the lake, at the far end of which is this pump.

Pictures are mostly phone.













Water no longer flows over the wheel but is diverted down a chute on the right.

















The wheel drove a reciprocating pump with three cylinders.

























On the right of the picture below is a large iron ballast tank at the corner of the wall, and on the left a clutch mechanism for engaging the pump.









I didn’t notice a makers name on the pump or wheel, but some of the pipework at least was made by T Adams of Manchester - no info about this manufacturer that I can find.



 

Mikeymutt

28DL Regular User
Regular User
That is stunning. The whole set up is beautiful. You have inspired me with these little finds and I am awaiting for some replica old OS maps at the min.
 

Down and beyond

The true source of englands wealth is coal
Regular User
That is a cracker and beautifully cast it is ! I bet that cost some serious money in its day !
Picture 3 if you include the map is fabulous, it reminds me of a gold dredging barge !

did you walk up to the boat house / saw mill area ?
 
Last edited:

tigger

mog
Regular User
One of the only things on the main part of the estate which doesn't look like a Swiss building.
T (homas) Adams had a small engineering works at Gorton. Little known as apart from a single good design for a non-return valve he had no commercial success in the wider field (where most engineers did).
If you didn't look at the water-powered sawmill that was (I say was because the estate were going to strip the interior so it could be used as accomodation for wedding guests...no idea if that ever happened though). Even if modified internally the exterior is postcard-pretty!
 

urbanchemist

28DL Regular User
Regular User
did you walk up to the boat house / saw mill area ?
One of the only things on the main part of the estate which doesn't look like a Swiss building.
T (homas) Adams had a small engineering works at Gorton. Little known as apart from a single good design for a non-return valve he had no commercial success in the wider field (where most engineers did).
If you didn't look at the water-powered sawmill that was (I say was because the estate were going to strip the interior so it could be used as accomodation for wedding guests...no idea if that ever happened though). Even if modified internally the exterior is postcard-pretty!
Thanks for the info about Adam's valve.

I didn't look at the sawmill - someone who lives a bit closer might want to see if there's anything left inside - looks like it's practically on a public footpath.
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Agree with all above. What a stunner. I was captured by your opening line "One of the larger water wheel pumps I’ve come across. " Then that opening shot, and the ones that followed. Exploring the forgotten at its best. So so beautiful. Wouldn't you just love to wake up to that view in summer every day.

That wheel is amazing, its housing solid, so rustic and amazing in its build. Loved this.
 

Cuuvin

28DL Colonial Member
28DL Full Member
Aces, Mate !!! :thumb Amazed the pikeys haven't stripped it bare. Got the angles well covered, and I'd say, keep using that ol' phone!
 

Similar threads


Top