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Queen Anne Statue, Hastings- March 2020 | Other Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Queen Anne Statue, Hastings- March 2020


ExplorerCouple101

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
This statue of Queen Anne was sculpted by Frances Bird and Sir Christopher Wren, back in 1712. This statue was enveiled on 7th July 1713 at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Ludgate Hill, London. However, moved in 1881 to the current location next to the Conquest Hospital.

This is a grade 2 listed building, which is meant to have regular maintenance. However, of which you can see in the pictures does not and probably hasn’t ever had any maintenance.

*Note the following description is copied from the Public Sculptures of Sussex website, because I thought it is a good description of the original statue.*

The Queen is represented standing, the crown on her head, the Order of St. George round her neck, and with the sceptre in her right hand and the orb in her left. Her sceptre is held pointing downwards. The Queen looks imperiously upwards and to her right. The statue has a substantial oval self-base. The plinth is also oval in general section, with an elaborate cornice, and four projections, corresponding with the four surrounding allegorical figures. Between the projections are panels with frame mouldings. The whole structure stands on a circular platform... To the front of the plinth stands a cartouche with the Royal Arms. Britannia, to the left of it, supports it with her left hand. From the four projections on the plinth, volutes curve outwards and down to form seats for the four female personifications. ...Britannia was looking upwards to her left, and wearing a laurel wreath upon her head. She is amply dressed, with Minerva's breastplate with a gorgon mask, worn as a sash. With her right hand she supports a metal trident. Her left hand is resting on the cartouche with the Royal Arms. ''France'' is seated and looking slightly downwards to her right. She is amply clad and wears on her head a helmet with three fleurs-de-lis on the visor, surmounted by a plume sweeping back. Her right hand rests on a substantial truncheon, whose other end is upon the ground. With her right hand she holds a large mural crown, which rests on her advanced left leg. Unlike Britannia, who is opposite to her at the front of the monument, she has no physical contact with the cartouche with the Royal Arms. ''America'' is to the back of the monument on the North side. She looks upwards to her right and wears a feathered head-dress. Her body is naked, except for a feathered skirt and a drapery traversing her loins. This hangs between her legs and folds about her right arm. Her hair falls onto her shoulders. She has a quiver of arrows on her back, supported by a strap, which appears over her left shoulder. In her left hand she supports a metal bow. Her right hand is raised and appears to have been clasping something, possibly an arrow. Her naked right foot rests on a severed, bearded male head, behind which stands a large lizard. ''Ireland'' is seated at the back on the south side. She is well draped but has a bare left breast. Her hair is loose and hangs down her back. A harp rests on her right thigh, supported by both hands.

This statue must've been a beauty in its hay day. Although still very beautiful today. The statue has been broken, due to general erosion or by vandals. There is a lot of litter around the statue and you have got to climb through a gap in the scafolding to get inside. But in my opinion a beautiful explore. Also on the same site, there is an old nunnery, nearly fully collapsed and unaccessible, but still a good explore.

The first photo is taken from the Public sculpture website to show what this statue was like orgianlly. The other photos are my own.

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SuckMyStump666

28DL Member
28DL Member
....or maybe I was informed wrongly when I visited it 3 years ago....as i was even told the tale of why in a lower statue she was stood upon a mans head.
 

ExplorerCouple101

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
....or maybe I was informed wrongly when I visited it 3 years ago....as i was even told the tale of why in a lower statue she was stood upon a mans head.
Thank you for your comment.

I was going by what I have always been told (having lived in the area all my life) and the research I done. I used the link below mainly as well, as a few others. I could be wrong with the research I done. People do make mistakes

 

lucertola

28DL Member
28DL Member
....or maybe I was informed wrongly when I visited it 3 years ago....as i was even told the tale of why in a lower statue she was stood upon a mans head.
You were absolutely 'informed wrongly'! This statue has a clear and well documented history and is identical to the one outside of St Paul's!
 

lucertola

28DL Member
28DL Member
Thank you for your comment.

I was going by what I have always been told (having lived in the area all my life) and the research I done. I used the link below mainly as well, as a few others. I could be wrong with the research I done. People do make mistakes

Your research is absolutely correct - the statue has nothing to do with Mary Magdalene, nor in fact with the convent - Augustus Hare brought it to Holmhurst long before the convent ever existed there. I wrote the PMSA database entry - the history of this allegorical group is extremely well documented!
 

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