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Report - - RAF Coningsby Remote Weapons Store, Lincolnshire - February 2019 | Military Sites | Page 2 | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - RAF Coningsby Remote Weapons Store, Lincolnshire - February 2019


MickH

28DL Member
28DL Member
Nice report and excellent pics. Just a quick point, no one died in the accident. Two Plums were severely injured, but both survived. A bit of an urban legend that doesn't hold up.
 

AndyK

Behind Closed Doors
Staff member
Moderator
I worked in the Bomb dump at coningsby in 1993! Worked in building 12 servicing missiles had a great bunch of blokes that I worked with.
Sorry Mate but NOBODY was killed in the SNEB accident in 14J in 1971, I was there!
the diesel gen-set is a english electric , also found in trains and big ships
Nice report and excellent pics. Just a quick point, no one died in the accident. Two Plums were severely injured, but both survived. A bit of an urban legend that doesn't hold up.
Thanks for the comments, very interesting to hear from people who worked there. Also thanks for information relating to the SNEB incident - I'm pleased to hear no one lost their lives.
 

bdeye

28DL Member
28DL Member
1972. My first posting in the RAF as a 19 year old LAC. It was a thriving busy place. It was known as the Bomb Dump as were all Explosive Storage Areas. We knew it as 'The Dump'. I could tell many tales of this place but the photos are very nostalgic for me. The accident in 1971. It wasn't fatal. The Building you see 14J was known as a Missile Prep building. It was drive through and had two licences to operate in, changed by the simple act of locking one tool cupboard and unlocking the other. A Type S trolley carried 4 Matra Pods. The rockets were fetched by fork lift form another storage building and loaded, ready to be towed over to 'the other side' and clamped onto a Phantom, then in its ground attack role. A locally made test set which sent a ripple test current throught the Matra rocket pod's 18 rocket tubes was in use. Unfortunately the test was shortcut by simply disconnecting the rockets and pulling them out slightly. One was left connected by mistake. It fired as designed, severed the leg of one of the young armourers, went through the reinforced door and ended up in a static water tank. When I was there the lad behind was still picking bits of shrapnel out of himself!
The whole place was a place of nature if you forgot its warlike intent lying on one of the traversed grass covered buildings on a sunny day. I am going to save these photos. I doubt we were allowed cameras in those days and even now phones would have to be left in the Piquet post along with smoking materials before entering the site. If you are interested I can tell much more and expand on Andy's interesting post. I am sure there are others around with better or different memories but they will all remember the pause in conversation as three Phantoms took off together from the eastern end of the runway not far from the building marked as 12, the tallest where we would sledge down on cardboard on snowy days.
 

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