Web
Analytics
Report - - RAF West Raynham, Norfolk - October 2013 | Military Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - RAF West Raynham, Norfolk - October 2013


Adam X

It's a derpy job...
28DL Full Member
The advantage to exploring a site when having researched virtually nothing about it in advance is that everything you come across during the explore is as new and as interesting as it's going to get.

There's no danger of feeling as if you're just going through the motions, or are trying to capture photos that far more talented photographers than you have already done to far greater effect than you ever will.

It's also quite pleasing to then look through some past reports of the same site, and see that your eye has picked out some of the same details as those photographers whom you admire.

But it's a real fucker when you get home and realise that there was a sodding former missile training dome a couple of hundred metres away from where you explored to before you got hungry and headed home.

The silver linings to this tale are twofold:

1. I really enjoyed what I did see; and
2. It's nice and local, so I'll definitely be making like Arnie in the not too distant future to visit the bits that I missed this time around.

Quick history, nicked from wiki:


RAF West Raynham was a Royal Air Force station located 2 miles (3.2 km) west of the village of West Raynham in Norfolk, England, opened in the 1930s. RAF Bomber Command flew missions from RAF West Raynham during the Second World War, with the loss of 86 aircraft.

The station closed in 1994, though the Ministry of Defence (MoD) retained it as a strategic reserve. Having laid derelict since closure, the MoD elected in 2004 that it was surplus to requirements, and the site was sold in 2006.

The site is now managed by FW Properties of Norwich, acting for administrators Moore Stevens. A number of the residential properties are now renovated and are either for sale or rental. On the technical site, Norfolk Oak from Anmer Hall, have acquired two of the large C-Type hangars and the old WW2 control tower, which are currently being refurbished for use as a full manufacturing facility.

The boiler house, twixt the grass...
DSC02886_zps04330c71.jpg



DSC02837_zps2e98cab9.jpg


DSC02840_zpsf1d69baf.jpg


DSC02852_zpsca388394.jpg


DSC02854_zps59435604.jpg


DSC02864_zps72e9093e.jpg


Dora P found some owl pellets in this room. We took two home and performed a Springwatch Live-esque autopsy on them in front of the parents-in-law when they invited us around for dinner that evening. We found 2 mouse skulls and 5 live maggots. The mother-in-law was 50% fascinated and 50% disgusted. The father-in-law was 100% disgusted. True story.
DSC02875_zps4be7e88b.jpg


DSC02895_zps59350f22.jpg


Small outbuilding / former chemical store.
DSC02906_zps03cf3f56.jpg


Apart from a dead pheasant this was the only thing of any interest in the barracks (Edwards) that we explored.
DSC03029_zpsaff5216a.jpg


The Airmens' Restaurant. Loved the peeling paint ceiling.
DSC02938_zps6990dc77.jpg


DSC02944_zps6222b04c.jpg


View back to the boiler house.
DSC02930_zps85514ae9.jpg


Heading upstairs to the main landing.
Untitled_Panorama2_zpsef9ac32e.jpg


Untitled_Panorama1_zps8af9c9b0.jpg


DSC02986_zps9771d2f2.jpg


When we first headed upstairs we heard a noise which sounded like it might be a hornets’ nest. Or perhaps someone operating a chainsaw in the distance? But no.…looking up we realised that the ceilings and some of the windows were crawling with literally BILLIONS of tiny flies. *bleurgh* Thankfully we had our masks on, and they seemed to keep to themselves rather than flying around, but the constant noise made our skin crawl.
DSC03001_zpsd2833391.jpg


DSC03007_zpsc5848edd.jpg


Obligatory PPP.
DSC03013_zps0b64893d.jpg


DSC03035_zpsc56f03c8.jpg


And time to get the flock out.
DSC03017_zps33cd488d.jpg


As always, thanks for looking.

Extended set (including the aforementioned dead pheasant) can be viewed at my blog.
 

Similar threads


Top