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Report - - Ravenstones / Ashway Gap Tunnel May 2017 | UK Draining Forum | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - Ravenstones / Ashway Gap Tunnel May 2017

EOA

Exploring with Bob
Regular User
#1
Ashway Gap is an explore I have been looking forward to ever since I got into drains (physically and metaphorically). I just had to wait for the water level to drop. It’s well known locally, because it stands magnificently over a very popular reservoir walk and cuts dramatically through the pretty hillside. In full flow, it’s a very impressive sight, because it takes drainage from a large area.

A snap of the outflow cutting through the hillside on its journey down to Dovestones Reservoir...

1-SuperVibrantTrees85b31.jpg


There used to be a pumping house and a gothic mansion at the bottom of the outflow, but both have long since gone. The pumping house was to help get rid of the peaty colour of the water.

There is a brilliant history painted by TLR is his report here, and I cannot do better so I’ll let you read that. But, for the potted version; there are unsolved murders on the moors (before Myra and Hindley), an MP killing himself accidentally with his own gun (which led to the mansion standing empty), angry mill owners baulking at reservoir construction, and the resulting brick and gritstone tunnel that now stretches over a kilometre from Ravestone's to Ashway Gap, built to appease their gripping.

The mill owners had been worried that the system of reservoirs would stop the flow of water to their mills and the Ashway Tunnel was meant to prevent that happening. It now probably operates as a massive overflow system, taking the strain off the smaller overflows of Yeoman and Greenfield Reservoirs, which never seem to see much action.

A snap looking down from the walk up to the outflow at night. You can just make out the water glistening as it steps down the channel to the reservoir below.

2-SaddleworthAurorab3cc5.jpg


My explore was a solo mission, taking advantage of a couple spare hours. I decided to go in the outflow, which involved something like a 10 or 12 foot climb down the grit stoned wall. Once I’d reached the green carpet of slippery algae covering the mouth of the outflow, I started unpacking my camera. It was only then I realised that I'd left the clip which attaches to the camera to my tripod at home, having taken it off the night before for some camera rotation stuff. Happily, I’d brought an additional lighting stand with me and luckily that had the right screw thread to fit my camera, so all hope was not lost. However, I’d lost a lot of functionality with it. I could only take photos facing straight forwards and could not tilt the camera to face any direction. A bit gutted, I decided to bat on.

A snap looking into the outflow following my descent. The white speck isn't dust, it's the inflow in the distance.

3-Intheholee1e30.jpg


I was still a bit miffed by my own stupidity at this point, but started to cheer up once I got inside. This was a snap looking out of the outflow after a short meander in. I swear I heard bats as I first entered and shone my torch, but that was all I heard so may be not. Apparently this is one of the highest tunnels of it's type in the UK at over 1000 feet above sea level and I think is shows from this aspect. By now I decided that I was going to suffer wet feet rather than risk slipping over on the slimy edges. My walking boots are old and have holes. My wellies would have been a poor choice for the descent.

4-IntheOuteafd4.jpg


One of the things you notice straight away is the noise of running water and it is not immediately apparent what that is as you look further up the tunnel. I used a more powerful torch than a 7.2 lenser to light this up since the 7.2 didn't carry far enough. The top of the tunnel was studded on the outflow. Not sure whether this was to carry a pipe at some stage or to help secure the ceiling. Anyway, there were some reflections at this point so I thought I'd take advantage...

5-FirstSight06495.jpg


About halfway in I switched to a fish eye lens, because I think they do quite well with cylindrical tunnels. And at about half way up from the outflow, maybe a bit further towards the inflow, is a fucking great waterfall that you can hear all the way through the tunnel. As you approach the plummeting water the sound gets louder and louder in a way that is the complete opposite of welcoming, especially if you've ever seen this thing as a raging torrent. It's probably compounded by the metal sheeting that has been ripped up and bent backwards at some point, presumably by the water cascading through it in full flow.

6-AshwayGapWaterfall46acd.jpg


After a short walk from the waterfall, a capture of the inflow through the fisheye showing the journey still to be had.

7-towardstheOut3ba61.jpg


And on and on until the light at the end of the tunnel gets brighter. At least after the waterfall there is a less water knocking about, but you'd still think a thousand slugs had partied in the tunnel like it was 1999.

8-LightattheEndoftheTunnel4b747.jpg


The inflow. Not quite as picturesque as the view through the outflow. At least if you ever get flushed through this, you'll know that your final moments will include a breathtaking view. That's a little ironic, I guess. Funny though.

9-NearlyThere5abf7.jpg


A fisheye view of the inflow.

10-TheInFlow77009.jpg


Up the ladders. Quick snap of the warning sign on my phone and a meander back to the car park. I didn't get some of the shots I came for because of my camera tripod mix up, and I couldn't turn my camera to face some of the details along the way, but it was still a nice wander and I'll just have to go back. Although, I end up thinking the same thing about all the drains I go in and there are plenty more to see...

This is one of two waterfalls that feed this inflow down through Birchen Clough, 20 or so meters further up. Much higher here than it was on my visit (when it was nothing but a trickle), but still not as fierce as it can be. I went up here the day after the last floods to take some snaps and this whole area resonated with the thunderous sound of crashing water. The water was so fierce that it was just a sea of white.

11-BirchinCloughWaterFallf6101.jpg


Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoyed the report.

Cheers,

EOA
 

EOA

Exploring with Bob
Regular User
#3
'Event Horizon'

You've obviously seen that and the whole ashway gap madness when it floods, I'm not able to link the video but it's seriously mental!
I've seen the video of the absolute nutter who jumps in it when it's raging. Not sure I'd even want to walk up the side of it. Next time it is firing on all cylinders I'll be having a wander up though to see what I can capture without dying... :)
 

Ojay

Admin
Staff member
Admin
#4
I've seen the video of the absolute nutter who jumps in it when it's raging. Not sure I'd even want to walk up the side of it. Next time it is firing on all cylinders I'll be having a wander up though to see what I can capture without dying... :)
I'll be flying the drone over next time, got a long wait for anything like that to occur again
 

Torchlight

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#6
Ashway Gap is an explore I have been looking forward to ever since I got into drains (physically and metaphorically). I just had to wait for the water level to drop. It’s well known locally, because it stands magnificently over a very popular reservoir walk and cuts dramatically through the pretty hillside. In full flow, it’s a very impressive sight, because it takes drainage from a large area.

A snap of the outflow cutting through the hillside on its journey down to Dovestones Reservoir...

1-SuperVibrantTrees85b31.jpg


There used to be a pumping house and a gothic mansion at the bottom of the outflow, but both have long since gone. The pumping house was to help get rid of the peaty colour of the water.

There is a brilliant history painted by TLR is his report here, and I cannot do better so I’ll let you read that. But, for the potted version; there are unsolved murders on the moors (before Myra and Hindley), an MP killing himself accidentally with his own gun (which led to the mansion standing empty), angry mill owners baulking at reservoir construction, and the resulting brick and gritstone tunnel that now stretches over a kilometre from Ravestone's to Ashway Gap, built to appease their gripping.

The mill owners had been worried that the system of reservoirs would stop the flow of water to their mills and the Ashway Tunnel was meant to prevent that happening. It now probably operates as a massive overflow system, taking the strain off the smaller overflows of Yeoman and Greenfield Reservoirs, which never seem to see much action.

A snap looking down from the walk up to the outflow at night. You can just make out the water glistening as it steps down the channel to the reservoir below.

2-SaddleworthAurorab3cc5.jpg


My explore was a solo mission, taking advantage of a couple spare hours. I decided to go in the outflow, which involved something like a 10 or 12 foot climb down the grit stoned wall. Once I’d reached the green carpet of slippery algae covering the mouth of the outflow, I started unpacking my camera. It was only then I realised that I'd left the clip which attaches to the camera to my tripod at home, having taken it off the night before for some camera rotation stuff. Happily, I’d brought an additional lighting stand with me and luckily that had the right screw thread to fit my camera, so all hope was not lost. However, I’d lost a lot of functionality with it. I could only take photos facing straight forwards and could not tilt the camera to face any direction. A bit gutted, I decided to bat on.

A snap looking into the outflow following my descent. The white speck isn't dust, it's the inflow in the distance.

3-Intheholee1e30.jpg


I was still a bit miffed by my own stupidity at this point, but started to cheer up once I got inside. This was a snap looking out of the outflow after a short meander in. I swear I heard bats as I first entered and shone my torch, but that was all I heard so may be not. Apparently this is one of the highest tunnels of it's type in the UK at over 1000 feet above sea level and I think is shows from this aspect. By now I decided that I was going to suffer wet feet rather than risk slipping over on the slimy edges. My walking boots are old and have holes. My wellies would have been a poor choice for the descent.

4-IntheOuteafd4.jpg


One of the things you notice straight away is the noise of running water and it is not immediately apparent what that is as you look further up the tunnel. I used a more powerful torch than a 7.2 lenser to light this up since the 7.2 didn't carry far enough. The top of the tunnel was studded on the outflow. Not sure whether this was to carry a pipe at some stage or to help secure the ceiling. Anyway, there were some reflections at this point so I thought I'd take advantage...

5-FirstSight06495.jpg


About halfway in I switched to a fish eye lens, because I think they do quite well with cylindrical tunnels. And at about half way up from the outflow, maybe a bit further towards the inflow, is a fucking great waterfall that you can hear all the way through the tunnel. As you approach the plummeting water the sound gets louder and louder in a way that is the complete opposite of welcoming, especially if you've ever seen this thing as a raging torrent. It's probably compounded by the metal sheeting that has been ripped up and bent backwards at some point, presumably by the water cascading through it in full flow.

6-AshwayGapWaterfall46acd.jpg


After a short walk from the waterfall, a capture of the inflow through the fisheye showing the journey still to be had.

7-towardstheOut3ba61.jpg


And on and on until the light at the end of the tunnel gets brighter. At least after the waterfall there is a less water knocking about, but you'd still think a thousand slugs had partied in the tunnel like it was 1999.

8-LightattheEndoftheTunnel4b747.jpg


The inflow. Not quite as picturesque as the view through the outflow. At least if you ever get flushed through this, you'll know that your final moments will include a breathtaking view. That's a little ironic, I guess. Funny though.

9-NearlyThere5abf7.jpg


A fisheye view of the inflow.

10-TheInFlow77009.jpg


Up the ladders. Quick snap of the warning sign on my phone and a meander back to the car park. I didn't get some of the shots I came for because of my camera tripod mix up, and I couldn't turn my camera to face some of the details along the way, but it was still a nice wander and I'll just have to go back. Although, I end up thinking the same thing about all the drains I go in and there are plenty more to see...

This is one of two waterfalls that feed this inflow down through Birchen Clough, 20 or so meters further up. Much higher here than it was on my visit (when it was nothing but a trickle), but still not as fierce as it can be. I went up here the day after the last floods to take some snaps and this whole area resonated with the thunderous sound of crashing water. The water was so fierce that it was just a sea of white.

11-BirchinCloughWaterFallf6101.jpg


Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoyed the report.

Cheers,

EOA
 

EOA

Exploring with Bob
Regular User
#9
As promised here are a couple of notable clips when it comes to draining here :D
Haha, that's great. I'd seen the second one but not the dingy shenanigans. I need to do something with a dingy...

The most unsettling thing about Ashway Gap are those two Siphons that lurk menacingly in the pool below the outflow, without seeming to do anything apart from lurking menacingly. A bit like the waterfall in the middle, god knows what they're connected to.

Thanks @Torchlight - not quite as epic as your attack on the deep end of Megatron, but a nice wander all the same :)