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Report - - Rhosydd Slate Mine - Wales - Dec '18 | Mines and Quarries | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Rhosydd Slate Mine - Wales - Dec '18



Mr Sam

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#1
A day before my 31st birthday and i get a reminder of how un fit i am, The walk (mountain climb) to Cwmorthin Lake level is a killer and then it goes up even more to Rhosydd. We made the most of the sunny weather seeing surface features while we had daylight then ventured into the adit and through the maze of passages chambers and inclines. Popping out the top into a quarry unfortunately snow and ice meant the way out was all the way back through the mine.

visited with @alex17595

Rosydd album on Flickr

Rhosydd Quarry is a slate mine northeast of Porthmadog in North Wales. Small-scale working of the site began in the 1830s, but was hampered by the remote location, and the lack of a transport system to carry the slates to markets. The Rhosydd Slate Company was formed in 1853, and became a limited company in 1856. Transport was made more difficult by the attitude of the Cwmorthin Quarry, through whose land the most obvious route to the Ffestiniog Railway ran. A solution was found in 1864, with the opening of the Croesor Tramway, to which the quarry was connected by one of the longest single-pitch inclines in Wales. Huge amounts of money were spent on development work, and the company, unable to make adequate returns, went into voluntary liquidation in 1873.

The quarry was auctioned in 1874, and the New Rhosydd Slate Quarry Company Ltd was formed. Unlike its predecessor, the directors were all Welsh, and three-quarters of the shareholders were also from the local area. The quarry prospered for a while, but then profitability declined, and in 1900, a large section of the underground workings collapsed. The job of opening up new areas was spearheaded by Evan Jones, who nearly succeeded, but was hampered by a slump in the slate industry and the onset of the First World War, when the quarry was "non-essential" and was mothballed. It reopened in 1919, but was in a poor financial position, and was bought by members of the Colman family, better known for producing mustard. They kept it running until 1930, but failed to find markets for the finished product. It was mothballed until 1947, when it was sold, but new plans to reopen it failed, and the pumps were turned off in 1948, after scrapmen had removed much of the machinery.



























Bizarre to come across a canoe underground! this takes you through to Croesor mine
 

alex17595

Under a mountain
28DL Full Member
#4
A day before my 31st birthday and i get a reminder of how un fit i am, The walk (mountain climb) to Cwmorthin Lake level is a killer and then it goes up even more to Rhosydd.

Don't worry Sam Im now 2/2 for people moaning about the walk up so your not the first. I have been up there in heavy rain and it was no fun at all.
 

alex17595

Under a mountain
28DL Full Member
#9
As an avid canoeist i would be happy just getting in that canoe to say I've paddled underground but i have 0 rope work skills and don't fancy a cave rescue call out!

I will take you back with the ladder one day and you can furfill your life long ambition
 

LittleOwl

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#10
Love those railway tracks. Gotta say I'm as perplexed as you are about the canoe
 

lueek22

28DL Member
28DL Member
#11
Wow, great pictures mate! love the one of the break in on the rock mountain. The canoe was weird to say the least! haha