Web
Analytics
Report - - ROUND BARN QUARRY/MINE FEB 2015 | Mines and Quarries | 28DaysLater.co.uk
  • Welcome to 28DaysLater.co.uk - 28DL - The UK Urban Exploring / Urban Exploration / Urbex Forums.

    Asylums and Hospitals, High Stuff, Industrial, Leisure Sites, Residential Sites, Military Sites, Mines and Quarries, ROC Posts, Theatres and Cinemas, Draining, Underground Sites, European and International Sites, Leads, Rumours and News, Kit, Clothing, Equipment, Photography and Video sections, plus Private & Local Groups and a lot more.

    Please feel free to browse this website as a guest. However, creating an account allows you to search, post replies, start new threads, use bookmarking, live chat, messaging and notification systems. Also, it removes some ads.

    Create an account | Login | Request new password

Report - ROUND BARN QUARRY/MINE FEB 2015

stonemonkey

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#1
Visited with Mr pink and none member and again with Motionless Escapes a few weeks later.


History……..

Spent a while googling this place and didn’t find a right lot…………

Basically it was mainly extracting sandstone flagstones.

Quarlton Vale Print & Bleachworks and other local print works used massive stone printing tables in the early 19th century (the term ‘off stone’ still being used at printers today – Ed). The early methods of cloth printing was carried out by pressing onto the cloth, inked wooden blocks, usually made of sycamore, which had the required design carved into the block face. To carry out the process the length of cloth needed to be held flat onto the table top for a reasonable ‘run’, thus enabling the blocks to print a continuous design.

John Horrocks, a Quaker, of Bradshaw Hall, leased a sandstone quarry in Edgeworth for the production of millstones. A speciality of his firm was the manufacture of stone block printing tables which he supplied to Quarlton Vale Print & Bleachworks and other Bolton district calico printers. Horrocks also extracted flagstones out of Round Barn Quarry, Entwistle. Very much a local quarrying entrepreneur at both quarries, he laid down waterwheel powered, mechanical, grinding and polishing machinery for the production of the stone tables, the finish of which had to be dead smooth. The water for powering the waterwheels was conveyed to the works by leats from Bradshaw Brook.

Another local worthy, Thomas Thomasson, also a Quaker, owned a quarry on his estate in Edgeworth, out of which he extracted huge flagstones. When cut to size, and the top surface rubbed smooth by waterwheel powered machinery, these massive sandstone flags were then crafted into the same type of block print tables as sold by his rival, John Horrocks.

Many of these print tables consisted of huge slabs of sandstone measuring 10ft long x 5ft wide and between 6in and 8in thick. In 1832, a local newspaper reported on a number of stone printing tables being acquired by Quarlton Vale Print & Bleachworks which included, ‘a short table of 68in and two long tables’: the long tables could have measured 12ft x 5ft wide and up to 9in thick!!


Iv visited this quarry on numerous occasions checking out which routes are still possible to climb as this place had very good sections of mainly the higher grade trad routes, it was severely fractured/shattered then and still is. I never ended up climbing here as there only seems to be a handful of routes that I would like to climb given the nature of the rock.

We located the entrance to the first mine, went in and was pleasantly surprised to find quite a big opening and it all looks the same as its all square cut (pillar and stall) technique but this isn’t that big and getting lost in here just wouldn’t happen, the roof is so fragmented I would advise wearing a helmet, we witnessed some small fragmented pieces of rock falling from the roof, it really does make you keep an eye on the roof, the place feels unstable but a nice wander, once you have gone round a couple of turns I felt that I was further away than I was, especially as it all looks the same.

It doesn’t smell that nice either, although its really dry in places it kinda smells damp and slightly discusting.

The 2nd one we found is no where near as big and has a pool/flooded section, it smells worse than the first one, and feels more unstable than the first on especially when you see how rotten the wooden beams are holding up the roof, I do recall Mr pink touching one of the beams and his finger disappearing into the soft rotten wood!! Now that’s not reassuring at all. Im going back here soon, its worth a look round on a rainy night. Happy reading…

Anyway on with the pics……

23764355302_35b83818bd_c.jpg


23790209541_b329b5c2c2_c.jpg


23764357452_e09e25081e_c.jpg


23872720255_01640fb5a3_c.jpg


23245912063_7058fde4b5_c.jpg


23576991320_5cf4a615e5_c.jpg


23504803719_44d2fed0d5_c.jpg



One of the rotten structual roof beams.
23245910033_d16fed7533_c.jpg


Second mine

23790301421_2c74828faf_c.jpg


23764447782_3090415229_c.jpg



I didnt want to crawl in there!
23764453832_ca6d209d97_c.jpg


23246000583_f12c7caf3c_c.jpg


23577079370_cdfc41bfe0_c.jpg


Thanks for looking!
Stonemonkey​
 

stonemonkey

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#6
Chees fellas, its a good little mooch. I didn know how to take photos back then and still dont but the quality is slightly better now. lol
@The Lone Ranger ..... well you are used to the coppermines by now:D but yeah...... the whole place just feels...... FRAGILE!!
 

The Lone Ranger

Safety is paramount!
Staff member
Moderator
#7
Looks a bit more stable than Facit! Have come across the name of this place, but didn't know if it was doable. Glad to see it is, some interesting dark holes in this area.
 

stonemonkey

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#9
Looks a bit more stable than Facit! Have come across the name of this place, but didn't know if it was doable. Glad to see it is, some interesting dark holes in this area.
Yeah there is but let's leave the women out of it for now;)

I'm happy to go back there to try some new photo techniques if anyone fancy a look.