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Report - - Seven Pines (Bryan Forbes Mansion) - Virginia Water - May 2019 | Residential Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Seven Pines (Bryan Forbes Mansion) - Virginia Water - May 2019



The0farrell

South Wales
28DL Full Member
History - the house was originally bought for £7000 by Forbes and his wife. After Forbes died in 2013 (he died at his home), his wife eventually moved out into a flat and currently lives there. The mansion is apparently due to be demolished soon and it’s thought his wife didn’t want to live there anymore because it reminded her too much of him.

“The early months following his death were the worst, she remembers, because she was in their home, surrounded by their possessions. The desk where Forbes continued to write his novels even in ill health, the bed... all was empty with him gone.”

Also I believe that it was just hard for them to sell the house in general.

Explore - it says outside the mansion there’s guard dogs but there isn’t. No security at all. Nobody was on the road the entire time although all the other mansions are occupied. There is a sensor in the house that I noticed going off but I presume nobody cares about it because nobody showed up at the house while I was there. Access is very easy. The actual house is pretty big and I was there for around 45 minutes exploring. A lot of the books still remain there although it has begun to get more and more trashed... the electricity is still working at the moment as well.

Photos -

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Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Nice to see some different bits of this place. Shame it got hit by vandals and looters, Its was immaculate when @Andrew32 did it. But still has the wow factor in certain areas. and to see different bits in a post is giving me a fuller picture of the place. Nicely done :thumb
 

themeelly

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
My boyfriend and I tidied the cushions by the entrance and put the books on the shelves there not even a week ago because we felt terrible! I can't believe people trashed the place even more. Such a shame. Great report though! :)
 

Redavni Ecaps

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
why are there so many reports on this boring dump?
 

clarion

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Has anyone been into the cellar? It's mentioned in Bryan Forbes first memoir (Notes For a Life), flooded when he viewed in 1955 but got pumped out. There is also mention of a dividing wall coming up from the cellar to split the dining room in half.
 

Andrew32

Addicted to bad camera framing
28DL Full Member
Has anyone been into the cellar? It's mentioned in Bryan Forbes first memoir (Notes For a Life), flooded when he viewed in 1955 but got pumped out. There is also mention of a dividing wall coming up from the cellar to split the dining room in half.
I tried the door, its right outside the dining room but wouldn't budge, was thinking there could be some stuff down there as its the house's equivalent of the attic
 

clarion

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
I tried the door, its right outside the dining room but wouldn't budge, was thinking there could be some stuff down there as its the house's equivalent of the attic
I've just pulled his book from my shelf, this is some of what Bryan Forbes says about the place.

"It was built in 1937 by an eccentric millionaire called Tommy Blackhouse. Architecturally it's a mess from the outside and - the first time we saw it - looked a cross between a biscuit factory and an early Odeon cinema. I have mentioned earlier that ruins have always held a particular fascination for me. Age and neglect seem to combine to induce in me a feeling of mystery I long to share. Seven Pines had this immediate effect. All the locks had been broken by vagrants and we were able to wander inside the deserted shell. We spent an hour looking around the empty rooms. The dining-room divided into two by means of a substantial wall which could be made to rise from the cellars at the touch of a button. Apparently Mr Blackhouse had enjoyed playing practical jokes on unsuspecting friends who came to dinner. The control button for the wall had been put in the floor by his chair, and when he judged his guests sufficiently off-guard he would activate the machinery in the cellar and then hugely enjoy the resulting amazement that the disappearing or emerging wall produced. We went down into the cellars that first day, but they were under water and the massive electric motor that controlled the wall obviously beyond repair."

There is also another section about his boiler which at 7 years old flooded the kitchen. From pictures I've seen, it's spewing rusty water over the floor again.
 
Last edited:

Andrew32

Addicted to bad camera framing
28DL Full Member
I've just pulled his book from my shelf, this is what Bryan Forbes says about the place.

"It was built in 1937 by an eccentric millionaire called Tommy Blackhouse. Architecturally it's a mess from the outside and - the first time we saw it - looked a cross between a biscuit factory and an early Odeon cinema. I have mentioned earlier that ruins have always held a particular fascination for me. Age and neglect seem to combine to induce in me a feeling of mystery I long to share. Seven Pines has this immediate effect. All the locks had been broken by vagrants and we were able to wander inside the deserted shell. We spent an hour looking around the empty rooms. The dining-room divided into two by means of a substantial wall which could be made to rise from the cellars at the touch of a button. Apparently Mr Blackhouse had enjoyed playing practical jokes on unsuspecting friends who came to dinner. The control button for the wall had been put in the floor by his chair, and when he judged his guests sufficiently off-guard he would activate the machinery in the cellar and then hugely enjoy the resulting amazement that the disappearing or emerging wall produced. We went down into the cellars that first day, but they were under water and the massive electric motor that controlled the wall obviously beyond repair."

There is also another section about his boiler which at 7 years old flooded the kitchen. From pictures I've seen, it's spewing rusty water over the floor again.
Thats amazing stuff, seeing as the dining room floor is completely flat with no gaps its probably all gone. That sounds awesome though, i really want to try the cellar again at some point, dont know if taking something to it to pry open is any more an offence than trespassing already in the house though...
 

Giymo85

Amateur and proud
28DL Full Member
I've just pulled his book from my shelf, this is what Bryan Forbes says about the place.

"It was built in 1937 by an eccentric millionaire called Tommy Blackhouse. Architecturally it's a mess from the outside and - the first time we saw it - looked a cross between a biscuit factory and an early Odeon cinema. I have mentioned earlier that ruins have always held a particular fascination for me. Age and neglect seem to combine to induce in me a feeling of mystery I long to share. Seven Pines had this immediate effect. All the locks had been broken by vagrants and we were able to wander inside the deserted shell. We spent an hour looking around the empty rooms. The dining-room divided into two by means of a substantial wall which could be made to rise from the cellars at the touch of a button. Apparently Mr Blackhouse had enjoyed playing practical jokes on unsuspecting friends who came to dinner. The control button for the wall had been put in the floor by his chair, and when he judged his guests sufficiently off-guard he would activate the machinery in the cellar and then hugely enjoy the resulting amazement that the disappearing or emerging wall produced. We went down into the cellars that first day, but they were under water and the massive electric motor that controlled the wall obviously beyond repair."

There is also another section about his boiler which at 7 years old flooded the kitchen. From pictures I've seen, it's spewing rusty water over the floor again.
There is something quite poetic about the fact that, now he is gone, the building is once again being wandered about and explored in a similar manner.
 

Redavni Ecaps

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
You need to get into the cellar, this place sounds more interesting now, maybe the door has swollen making it tight to open.
 

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