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Report - - Shoreham Cement Works - Upper Bedding - July 2020 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Shoreham Cement Works - Upper Bedding - July 2020


DustySensorPhotography

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
I'd like to prelude this report with a brief apology for my recent inactivity. With the resurgence of educational establishments combined with work, I've been totally snowed under and unable to get out much at all or write many reports.
I will return in the very near future to frequent explores again, but for right now I will bless your eyes with Shoreham Cement Works :)


The History:
In theory Shoreham Cement works began producing cement in 1883, though in 1897 it was taken over by Sussex Portland Cement and production was upped significantly.
The whole plant was powered off gas and electricity, and indeed a gas making plant was installed to aid this process.
Despite the size of the kilns and their assumed difficult nature of rotation, only a 100hp gas engine was required to run the coal drying and grinding plants for them.
As previously mentioned, the takeover in 1897 caused the business to begin producing much more cement than ever before. The main methods for doing this were increased efficiency, larger and quicker imports and significant expansions to the building itself.

The Explore:
By this point we were a significant way into our week-long road trip, joined by the illustrious @UrbandonedTeam and @The Excursionists.
For this site specifically we were also joined by @xplorer.x and @KPUrban_ to show us around, since we had never been before and they had seemingly frequented it.
After a rather poor attempt at camping for the others and a dreadfully cold night's sleep for me and @The Excursionists in his car, we made our way at the crack of dawn to the infamous and esteemed Shoreham Cement works for an early morning explore.

The steep sided cliffs surrounding the industrial paragon show just how extensive this place was at the height of its production.
The conveyor shown in the photo below can be seen terminating just next to the chimney.
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The conveyor that would have carried raw materials into the factory is much steeper to walk up than it appears!
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Once inside it was clear that all had been worth it. The size and scale of the place is reminiscent of a power station in terms of how big everything is and the sheer human inability to realise and accept how extensive and cavernous the structure is.

These huge pipes are presumably for the extraction of effluvium from the kilns & machines to the chimney.
872022


A view of the kilns from a raised platform behind with the exhaust extraction pipes.
The kilns are said to be 49.7 metres long, which seems about right considering their inimitable size and extensiveness; it's a decent trek to go from one side of the kilns to the other!
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The pipes that (I'm led to believe) lead to the chimney are shown here from a floor below, leading up to the factory floor above.
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Smothered in a thick of ash, these kilns here are the main attraction of Shoreham for most people.
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The size of these kilns is hard to effectively represent, but the jumbo contraptions underneath, holding them up, should hopefully demonstrate their magnitude.
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Notwithstanding the evident vandalism, it's obvious to see that, at one point, this would have been a very nice antiquated control room, complete with the outdated stone-grey mechanical control boards.
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The motor hall is one part of the complex that the security have attempted to 'seal', and by seal I mean lock the door but leave every single window smashed and open to even the most primitive explorer...:banghead
Nonetheless, this room's artistic touch cannot be underplayed. For once I think I'm going to have to say that *some* of this graffiti actually compliments the walls, as it was not all primary-school-tier spray painting.
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This huge empty hall was presumably used for the extraction of the cement once the production process had finished. The hoppers on the right were probably for the easy movement of some sort of substance (whether or not it's cement I cannot confirm).
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From the roof of the kilns block, the chimney can be seen rising from the integuments of the ground like some sort of supercolossal cocktail stick, only accessible by a free climb of an exterior ladder; hats off to anybody who can do that!
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Thanks for reading!
 

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Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
1st photo a cracker, as are all, but that one is great. I must get round to doing this. I think the long trek is putting me off lol. I hated Shore mead fort trek, and Cliff fort. So I expect this to be as long :confused: just being a bit lazy I guess there. Though Id love to do this one
 

DustySensorPhotography

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
1st photo a cracker, as are all, but that one is great. I must get round to doing this. I think the long trek is putting me off lol. I hated Shore mead fort trek, and Cliff fort. So I expect this to be as long :confused: just being a bit lazy I guess there. Though Id love to do this one
Thanks Jane :) It's amazing once you look back at the photos, though admittedly it is a pain to get to, even for me in the midlands!
 

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