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Slacklining- Howto's, Q's and Pic's

Bunk3r

28DL Memb3r
Regular User
#1
Old news for some people on here but then there will be some that haven’t heard of it, or those that haven’t got round to it, so here's a new slacklining thread. All feel free to ask questions, post advice and post pictures on this thread.

People have walked on ropes etc as long as there have been ropes etc, the most notable style been tight rope walking, in tight rope walking the line is tensioned such that it is as static as possible, often with guy ropes and the walker uses a pole to aid balance. Slackline is different in that a balance pole isn’t used and the line is more dynamic, although it is under tension infact quite a surprising amount. Slackline is said to have originated in Yosemite with climbers first walking the carpark chains then setting up dedicated lines. Some purists say its only slackline if climbing equipment is used but with diversities needing longer stronger or simply more convenient lines all sorts of industrial equipment is used, I’m not fussy slackline covers a good range for me.

Slacklining is good for balance, concentration, and mostly general fun. Its been going on as slackline for decades but over the last few years people seem to have been really pushing the boundaries.

There are different types within slackline:
1) Longlines –as the name implies lines that are long, note a line that is twice as long is a LOT more than twice as hard to walk, also the tension needed goes up crazy too.

2) Highlines –lines up in high places,

3) Tricklines –people doing tricks on lines.
Get on youtube to see them all (look at Gibbon stuff for the tricks).

Equipment, theres hundreds of ways of doing it. The main parts are as follows:
1) Anchor: typically a pair of trees with a sling round each one. If the line is long (so lots of tension) or used a lot, or somewhere where people may moan its a good idea to protect the tree with card board or carpet etc. Wrap the sling round stick a krab on it (screwgate good as the line bouncing can open the gate, plenty of pictures of krabs bent by slacklines on the web). If you use (rated) tape/webbing you can tie it with a water knot (google it) to make a sling. Other anchors may include bolted things, Wodden A frames to get height, and any number of different things.

2) The line: Typically (rated) tubular flat webbing (from a climbing shop), typically 25mm wide but 50mm is popular for 'tricklines' I use a 50mm wide 5000kg rated ratchet strap, which brings us to the next point:

3) Tensioning: a pulley system can be made with a few karabiners, google “primitive slackline”. Longer lines use proper pulleys, but you’ll be doing a lot more walking and learning before you worry about that. I just use a 5000kg rated ratchet strap mechanism, it has disadvantages such as the weight on the line, but its simple and quick.
So theres the basics, you can use climbing gear (but not advisable to climb on it afterwards), a rated ratchet stap, or a purpose bought kit (some come with ratchets others with other systems).

The next thing is walking the line, its harder than it looks, disco legs ahoy.

So there you have it, get together and have fun.

A few snaps to get things rolling:

1) as I say different anchors can be used (I had wedged a log under it to stop the suspension bouncing, but the line still dragged the car in gear)
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2)Slacklining in Hull:
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3) Goan Slacklining:
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Tassadar

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#2
thought i recognised the hull ness in the back ground near the deep?
 

Bunk3r

28DL Memb3r
Regular User
#3
^yeah slacklined at that spot by the tidal barrier a few times with flyingmonkeycorps, Devster and Bugsuperstar. good times -one of which ended with placing a pirate flag on the top of the spurn light ship lol.
 

Oxygen Thief

Admin
Staff member
Admin
#4
I've just set up a couple of anchors, to make a short line with a ratchet strap. This might sound dumb, but what it the correct tension?
 

Styru

Admin
Staff member
Admin
#5
This can't be slacklining - where's the blood? - there's always blood!

(or is it just because I only ever try it when drunk?)
 

Bunk3r

28DL Memb3r
Regular User
#6
I've just set up a couple of anchors, to make a short line with a ratchet strap. This might sound dumb, but what it the correct tension?
good question, no easy way to measure but more than I first expected. on 10-20m lines I pretty much tighten the line as much as I can (but I dont have that much weight behind me, and not as tight as I can on less than 10M). tighter is easier, but arguably not as slackline was first intended (long 25mm lines are pretty stretchy), but then gibbon tricklines look to be a similar tension to mine (if not more). different people do it different. probably best judged by the amount of sag so compare to youtube videos. if it touches the floor when your in the middle theres not enough tension (although on long lines you still need the anchors high to avoid this)
 
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Bugsuperstar

Irresponsible & Reckless
Regular User
#9
yeah slacklined at that spot by the tidal barrier a few times with flyingmonkeycorps, Devster and Bugsuperstar. good times -one of which ended with placing a pirate flag on the top of the spurn light ship lol.
haha :D I'd forgotten about that...."bug, there's an alarm going off down here"....."what shall i do bunk3r?"........"hurry up." ........something like that was'nt it mate? lol

success800.jpg


slackline1800.jpg


bunkerslackliner800.jpg


ontheline800.jpg
 

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flyingmonkeycorps

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#10
Can't recommend how much fun this is enough... I now have two setups, one similar to Bunk3rs and one using 25mm webbing tensioned with a few 'biners. The rachet one I tend to run quite tight 'cos otherwise the weight really annoys me, the other one is much slacker - usually with a 10m line with the anchors above waist height I'm not much more then 6" off the ground in the middle.

I actually prefer the non-rachet line, it's a lot more dynamic but more predictable I think. That said I've not been on it yet this year so I've probably forgotten it all!
 

Bunk3r

28DL Memb3r
Regular User
#11
Had the line out with goan again last night. Setting up reminded me of a couple of handy hints to post here for new people with Ratchets:

-Before tightening pull the strap as tight as possible, and when tightening make sure you dont have too much line in the ratchet (keep an eye on how much space is taken up by the line round the spool)
-To release the line open the ratchet fully, doing this a cam pushes the release mechanism. When doing this make sure the loose end of the line is parallel with the line, and not just dangling off the side of the ratchet, as when the spool releases it spins (it sometimes goes with a bang) and you dont want the spin catching and pulling in the loose end and getting it tangled.
 
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flyingmonkeycorps

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#12
And a useful tip for if you're hand tensioning - if you have a spare karabiner, clove hitch it to the end of the line when you're pulling it to tension it, especially if you're on your own. 1" webbing can do unpleasant things to naked flesh...