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Report - - Southbank Coke Ovens - Sept 2016 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Southbank Coke Ovens - Sept 2016



Conrad

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#1
I was pleased to finally get around to visiting the coke ovens in Southbank even if a year late, much smaller then the main furnace site but definably worth a trip even if it is a bit bare on the inside now. I went during the day which I don't really like doing as it's not optimal, especially when I don't know much about the site in question but it worked out to be quite a chilled affair. Shots aren't the greatest as I'm currently lacking a tripod, that being said the daylight made for the opportunity to grab some good outside shots. This ones not too far from me so I might go back with a tripod get some better internals and cover some more of the site.

History

I'm sure you all know the history of the recent events affecting SSI and their 3 locations between Middlesborough and Redcar, However is a bit of copy and paste from southbankcokeovens.com

SBCO battery and by-products plant were originally built between 1953/56 and commissioned in 1957 however after 10 years of operation the batteries refractories were beyond repair due to poor operations. A new battery was commissioned in 1971 this battery ran in conjunction with the original 1957 By-products plant.

The coking process consists of heating coal in the absence of air in large coke oven batteries to drive off the volatile compounds; the resulting coke is a hard, but porous carbon material that is used for reducing the iron in the blast furnace. The By-product plant recovers volatile chemicals in the form of coke oven gas, tars, and oils.

The coke oven temperature is 1300 °C and the time it takes to turn coal into coke is known as the “Carb-time” which is usually about 19 hours. The coke is then pushed out of the oven with a machine known as “the pusher” and caught in a “coke car” which transports the hot coke to a quencher where it is cooled with water.

At its peak SBCO pushed 96 ovens per day 365 days a year, each push contained 19 tons of coke worth £3800. The price of coke constantly fluctuates just like currency.

SBCO employed 150 people.



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Bonus points for spotting the hi vis in the below,

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Looking towards the basic oxygen steelmaking plant.

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The coke ovens itself,

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Conrad

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#3
Top job mate... always find it odd (I was at Thoresby a few weeks ago and it was same) that these places shut up shop with piles of decent grade coal stockpiled, surely they could get shut on wind down?
I agree it's odd, seems like a common practice.
 

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