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Report - St Josephs Seminary - Upholland - 14/06/2019


cathmxo

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
St Josephs Seminary was a former Roman Catholic seminary in Upholland, England. The building was built in April 1880 and was opened in 1883.

St Joseph's, usually referred to by its students simply as "Up Holland", was one of two main seminaries serving the north of England. Up Holland served the northwest and Ushaw College the northeast. For many years, each of these institutions housed both a junior (minor) and a senior (major) seminary. The junior seminaries provided a secondary education in a semi-monastic environment to boys aged 11–18 who wished to pursue the priesthood, while the senior seminaries trained adult candidates, mostly aged between 18 and 24, in philosophy and theology, preparing them for the priesthood. A detailed account of daily life in the junior seminary at Up Holland during the 1960s, Boys of the Cloth, was published in 2012. This also explores the reasons why the Church's traditional form of seminary training may have predisposed some priests to molest children, which was one of the key findings of a major investigation conducted on behalf of American bishops into the causes of the sexual abuse crisis within the Catholic Church in the United States.

In 1986, the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer considered viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987, the remaining students continued to live at Up Holland but for classes attended St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell, an arrangement that continued until the last of these students left Up Holland in 1992.

The election of Patrick Kelly as Archbishop of Liverpool in 1996 saw the controversial decision to close St Joseph's altogether, and the property was sold for development to Anglo International, who instructed AEW Architects for the conversion of the Grade 2 listed buildings into 92 apartments, with 220 new build "enabling" units. The major controversies of the decision were the ongoing financial viability of St Joseph's, which had just started to make a small surplus under Devine's management, and the sale and disposal of the art and artefacts in the college, much of which had been donated by various parishes and people of the Archdiocese, who were not offered their donations back.

The explore

I have seen many reports on St Josephs scattered about on here but i've recently decided to give the Seminary a visit and boy i'm glad I did! Despite many other reports stating that the secca is high there it was a pretty straight forward and simple explore with no disturbances and an easy entrance. I believe the security are fighting a losing battle after seeing how many entrances there were that have not been re-boarded up.

We decided to walk along the 'public footpath' behind the school which we saw a few dog walkers strolling along and of course we were trying to look as unsuspicious as possible *Hides camera and equipment under hoodie* *admires how 'pretty' the trees are*. We found an easy and open entrance which was unfortunately under a pole full of cctv cameras - but we took the risk anyway and darted past into the first window which lead to one of the classrooms. From there we were able to access all of the Seminary easily.

Obviously we were on high alert for secca to begin with but the only obstacle we came across were cameras in the main corridor which we weren't sure were working or not, but we did not alert anyone. Also some of the upstairs in this place is highly decayed and pretty dangerous, I wouldn't test my luck walking on some parts (as you'll see in some of the pictures).

All in all was a pretty brilliant explore as I haven't explored in the UK for a while!
Thank you for reading! :)

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cathmxo

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
I've never seen this before. Any idea what it is?
I've never seen one before and unsure what it actually is. Tried to zoom in on the original photo and google what I could make out but theres no luck there unfortunately :(
 

joegaff7

28DL Member
28DL Member
St Josephs Seminary was a former Roman Catholic seminary in Upholland, England. The building was built in April 1880 and was opened in 1883.

St Joseph's, usually referred to by its students simply as "Up Holland", was one of two main seminaries serving the north of England. Up Holland served the northwest and Ushaw College the northeast. For many years, each of these institutions housed both a junior (minor) and a senior (major) seminary. The junior seminaries provided a secondary education in a semi-monastic environment to boys aged 11–18 who wished to pursue the priesthood, while the senior seminaries trained adult candidates, mostly aged between 18 and 24, in philosophy and theology, preparing them for the priesthood. A detailed account of daily life in the junior seminary at Up Holland during the 1960s, Boys of the Cloth, was published in 2012. This also explores the reasons why the Church's traditional form of seminary training may have predisposed some priests to molest children, which was one of the key findings of a major investigation conducted on behalf of American bishops into the causes of the sexual abuse crisis within the Catholic Church in the United States.

In 1986, the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer considered viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987, the remaining students continued to live at Up Holland but for classes attended St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell, an arrangement that continued until the last of these students left Up Holland in 1992.

The election of Patrick Kelly as Archbishop of Liverpool in 1996 saw the controversial decision to close St Joseph's altogether, and the property was sold for development to Anglo International, who instructed AEW Architects for the conversion of the Grade 2 listed buildings into 92 apartments, with 220 new build "enabling" units. The major controversies of the decision were the ongoing financial viability of St Joseph's, which had just started to make a small surplus under Devine's management, and the sale and disposal of the art and artefacts in the college, much of which had been donated by various parishes and people of the Archdiocese, who were not offered their donations back.

The explore

I have seen many reports on St Josephs scattered about on here but i've recently decided to give the Seminary a visit and boy i'm glad I did! Despite many other reports stating that the secca is high there it was a pretty straight forward and simple explore with no disturbances and an easy entrance. I believe the security are fighting a losing battle after seeing how many entrances there were that have not been re-boarded up.

We decided to walk along the 'public footpath' behind the school which we saw a few dog walkers strolling along and of course we were trying to look as unsuspicious as possible *Hides camera and equipment under hoodie* *admires how 'pretty' the trees are*. We found an easy and open entrance which was unfortunately under a pole full of cctv cameras - but we took the risk anyway and darted past into the first window which lead to one of the classrooms. From there we were able to access all of the Seminary easily.

Obviously we were on high alert for secca to begin with but the only obstacle we came across were cameras in the main corridor which we weren't sure were working or not, but we did not alert anyone. Also some of the upstairs in this place is highly decayed and pretty dangerous, I wouldn't test my luck walking on some parts (as you'll see in some of the pictures).

All in all was a pretty brilliant explore as I haven't explored in the UK for a while!
Thank you for reading! :)

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What the security like there? Planning a visit week after next.
 

cathmxo

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
What the security like there? Planning a visit week after next.
Thought it was going to be high security - but when we went we didn’t see or hear any security - it was literally dead, so i’d say be cautious but I think you’ll be fine!
 

Corypne

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Hi, I'm new to this exploring, I don't live to far from this place and looking to get into it to do some photography, how and what is the best way into this amazing place and what should I look out for? Thank you
 

Chickadea

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Hi, I'm new to this exploring, I don't live to far from this place and looking to get into it to do some photography, how and what is the best way into this amazing place and what should I look out for? Thank you
you're probably best taking the trip and working that one out for yourself.
 

DustySensorPhotography

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Really like your style of photos, and the filter works well with them :thumb You saw a lot of bits I didn't see when I went haha, gutted to see those sinks are fucked tho...
 

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