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Report - - Stillingfleet Coal Colliery - York, England - June 2020 | Mines and Quarries | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Stillingfleet Coal Colliery - York, England - June 2020


STILLINGFLEET COAL COLLIERY
- York, England
- June 2020

HISTORY
Stillingfleet Colliery was a mine which made up part of the Selby Coalfield Complex, that also included Wistow Mine, Riccall Mine, North Selby Mine, Whitemoor Mine and Gascoigne Wood Mine.
The Stillingfleet site opened in January 1988 as part of a 20-year project to create one of the world's biggest deep-pit mining complexes. The primary purpose of Stillingfleet Mine was to supply coal for electrical power generation, with coal it produced prepared and sent to Drax, Eggborough and other major power stations in the country.
During the 1990s, the mine employed more than 600 men and was one of the first pits in the country to mine a million tonnes of coal, also known as 'black gold'.
It had an impressive safety record, with one death in 16 years. Development worker Graham Steele died at Stillingfleet Mine in September 1988 after suffering serious injuries when a high-powered jet exploded in his face. The only other major incident occurred in April 1992, when eight miners were trapped after a roof collapse. All of the men were rescued without injury.
In the late 1990s, the coal started to run out and a number of miners were made redundant. The site eventually closed for good in 2004.
Redevelopment of the now overgrown site as a waste sorting centre has been sought by ASA Recycling Group Ltd since 2018, but currently nothing has gotten off the ground.

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EXPLORE
I really wanted to check this place out as it doesn't get explored much at all. The site is hidden away within dense woodland.
It has a very apocalyptic, Pripyat like vibe to it, with spooky trees and lonely lampposts leading up to the overgrown site. Wildlife and nature are working hard to reclaim the area, and there was lots of noises and hisses coming from the bushes. There was also a section of bushes littered with probably around fifty tyres.
The eeriest part had to be the food and drink still left on the table, almost as if the workers ate their last meal and it had simply remained in the same place there for the last 16 years.

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Thanks very much for looking. Sorry the pictures aren't the best this time.
 

pirate

Rum Swigger
Regular User
Be nice to know if some underground bits remain.
could be likely........I’m pretty sure no coal was raised here and it went along underground via the Gascoinge wood drift

Found this pic online
867559


best bet would be to look around areas of drift,it’s likely most of mine is flooded if not collapsed
 
Last edited:

gus960

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
could be likely........I’m pretty sure no coal was raised here and it went along underground via the Gascoinge wood drift

Found this pic online
View attachment 867559

best bet would be to look around areas of drift,it’s likely most of mine is flooded if not collapsed
One of the transformers is humming so I assume theres power to something.....talking to an old miner he reckons it would be to keep the pumps running?
 

alex17595

Down t'pit
28DL Full Member
One of the transformers is humming so I assume theres power to something.....talking to an old miner he reckons it would be to keep the pumps running?
They still extract gas at the site so most likely something to do with that.
 

pirate

Rum Swigger
Regular User
Yer if you have a look at this video it’s doubtful they are pumping water out.....it’s a massive task


when they sunk the shafts there was so much water they had to freeze the ground for 12months before they could concrete them.


if you have a look on google maps it looks like the drifts at Gascoigne wood have been completely destroyed,the large remaining building was the coal storage shed
 
Last edited:

DaveFM

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Yer if you have a look at this video it’s doubtful they are pumping water out.....it’s a massive task


when they sunk the shafts there was so much water they had to freeze the ground for 12months before they could concrete them.


if you have a look on google maps it looks like the drifts at Gascoigne wood have been completely destroyed,the large remaining building was the coal storage shed
The Coal Authority are usually pretty hot when it comes to sealing up disused coal workings but in any case any sort of deep mine for coal would be far beneath the water table and quite inaccessible even if an open entrance remained.
 

alex17595

Down t'pit
28DL Full Member
The Coal Authority are usually pretty hot when it comes to sealing up disused coal workings but in any case any sort of deep mine for coal would be far beneath the water table and quite inaccessible even if an open entrance remained.

There's usually about 50ft of concrete between the surface and the mine in the vast majority of former pits. The smaller private ones may differ depending on the owner.
 

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