Web
Analytics
Report - - Sunnyside Royal Hospital, Montrose, May 2018 | Asylums and Hospitals | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Sunnyside Royal Hospital, Montrose, May 2018


cgrizzy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
**This is my first report outside of the "International Sites" section; if there are any improvements I can make for future reports, please let me know!**​


A bit of history, courtesy of Memories of Sunnyside:

http://www.sunnyside.me.uk/

In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand.
During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town.
In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373.

Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904.

With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued.
All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland.
As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940).

Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time.

The site officially closed in 2011.


The explore:

I had been eyeing this asylum ever since arriving in the UK, but with the semester in full swing, it was difficult to justify a trip to Montrose earlier in the year. However, with uni winding down, I decided to take a solo weekend journey to Scotland early this month, splitting my time between leisure in Edinburgh and exploring Sunnyside. I knew the campus would be pretty, but upon arriving mid-afternoon and walking around the complex, I was thoroughly impressed by the natural beauty of the hospital's location, along with the architecture of the buildings themselves. As the sun set, I struck out on several buildings that were well-sealed, but with a helpful tip from mookster and some dumb luck, I was in good shape for the following day.

The next morning, I got up bright and early and made my way back to the hospital grounds.

Main building:




Infirmary building:




With the sun still below the horizon, I took some time to wander the dark halls of the main building. Initially, it seemed to be quite modernized, with plenty of cold and clinical decor. However, as I made my way further into the wards and wings, beige walls and linoleum gave way to brighter colors and more advanced decay. As others have described, walking through a doorway or up a stairwell could seemingly take you back several decades.













A little nook with attic access. After only a few hours of sleep, those mattresses looked quite comfy.










A more modern area of the building:




From here, it was on to the upper floors...













..Then down to the basement













A small record storage room:




After a quick walk to the village for some breakfast, I returned to check out more of the main building, including the dining area and main hall. The woodwork and decor in here were absolutely stunning, and these features were accentuated by the morning light pouring through the hall's massive windows. It was also here that I met a couple of other explorers, among the handful of people I'd meet throughout the day.






















Radio Sunnyside:







(Continued in pt. 2)
 
Last edited:

cgrizzy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Continued...

Kitchen and maintenance areas behind the hall:






















A small but cavernous area near the boiler house; curious what it was used for:




Mortuary and chapel of rest:







The infirmary:










At this point, with my camera batteries drained, I took a final stroll around the other side of campus, popping into the occupational therapy building and taking a few photos with my phone:










...and one final shot of the main building:




Even after hours of exploring over two days, I still felt there was plenty I had missed here, as Carnegie Clinic, Booth House and others remained tightly boarded. However, I'm glad I took the time to check it out, and spent as much time there as I did. It's an interesting contrast to many of the asylums in the States, and is a piece of history that I hope will be preserved far into the future.

Thanks for looking!
 
Last edited:

cgrizzy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
You've covered that well, not seen Radio Sunnyside before either.

That old wheelchair's moved some distance since I was there!
Cheers @Idle Hands! As Baggy trousers mentioned it's tucked away in the main hall, I nearly missed it!

Good work, this is my favourite coverage of the site so far. I need to remember to find that chapel of rest and radio sunnyside, there's so much to see haha
Thanks @UrbandonedTeam , yeah there are lots of nooks and crannies here, certainly a fun place to get lost :D
 

Olkka

28DL Regular User
Regular User
High density of reports coming from Sunnyside in the last couple of months but I really liked the photo style of this one, very well done. The yellow ward never gets old tbf!
Also great that visitors from far and wide are treating it as a museum in what could be its final year. Word around town from the owner is Carnegie's being turned into a luxury hotel, main building being turned into a retirement home. Northesk, the pointy rotting building, occupational therapy, infirmary, chapel, industrial bit and booth house all getting levelled, planning to begin work this December.
 

cgrizzy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
You've smashed that lad well done and you've covered a bit more than me too there.
Great report.
@Idle Hands and @UrbandonedTeam the radio station (if it is that) is at the side of the theatre through a little door.
@Baggy trousers thanks man, I enjoyed your report from here as well! I think we may have been here only a few days apart.

I had my doubts about whether Radio Sunnyside was a legitimate station, and there isn't much online, but I found this tidbit on the Memories of Sunnyside guest book:

I was a presenter/producer at Radio Sunnyside for the twenty years, along with my wife Ann - Radio Sunnyside was so special that in 2004 we won the Scottish National Health Service Award. Two programs were special Melody Mixture and Tartan Tonic. We called it radio therapy with a difference, and the difference was that the patients could take part. We formed many good relationships over the years. Our equipment was old, but it did the job.--Signed on 28th April, 2016 by Alllan Collins


There have been quite a few reports from here recently, but I have to say this is the best of the lot!

Top work.
Much appreciated @ZerO81 !
 

cgrizzy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
High density of reports coming from Sunnyside in the last couple of months but I really liked the photo style of this one, very well done. The yellow ward never gets old tbf!
Also great that visitors from far and wide are treating it as a museum in what could be its final year. Word around town from the owner is Carnegie's being turned into a luxury hotel, main building being turned into a retirement home. Northesk, the pointy rotting building, occupational therapy, infirmary, chapel, industrial bit and booth house all getting levelled, planning to begin work this December.
Cheers @Olkka , and thanks for the info! Shame so many of the buildings are to be leveled. Glad to hear that the main building and Carnegie will be repurposed, and not left to rot.
 

Baggy trousers

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
@Baggy trousers thanks man, I enjoyed your report from here as well! I think we may have been here only a few days apart.

I had my doubts about whether Radio Sunnyside was a legitimate station, and there isn't much online, but I found this tidbit on the Memories of Sunnyside guest book:

I was a presenter/producer at Radio Sunnyside for the twenty years, along with my wife Ann - Radio Sunnyside was so special that in 2004 we won the Scottish National Health Service Award. Two programs were special Melody Mixture and Tartan Tonic. We called it radio therapy with a difference, and the difference was that the patients could take part. We formed many good relationships over the years. Our equipment was old, but it did the job.--Signed on 28th April, 2016 by Alllan Collins




Much appreciated @ZerO81 !
Cheers dude and thanks for the info on that! I did wonder if it was a radio station or just some sort of sound control for the theatre, then again whilst walking thru the rooms after I could see speakers on the walls so put two and two together. Glad you liked mine too, and yes we must have visited around the same time hope you had again easier exit than mine !
 

Idle Hands

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Word around town from the owner is Carnegie's being turned into a luxury hotel, main building being turned into a retirement home. Northesk, the pointy rotting building, occupational therapy, infirmary, chapel, industrial bit and booth house all getting levelled, planning to begin work this December.
Historic Environment Scotland has lodged an objection to the demolition of six listed structures on the site, including Northesk Villa, Booth House, the workshops, fire station and water tower... hopefully somebody will listen and amend the plans. The site can more than take it.
 

cgrizzy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Cheers dude and thanks for the info on that! I did wonder if it was a radio station or just some sort of sound control for the theatre, then again whilst walking thru the rooms after I could see speakers on the walls so put two and two together. Glad you liked mine too, and yes we must have visited around the same time hope you had again easier exit than mine !
@Baggy trousers no worries! And yes thankfully no locals gave chase this time :p

Superb pics and write up, captured her well
@Session9 Much appreciated!
 

Top