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Report - - Temple Gasworks, Glasgow - September 2014 | High Stuff | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Temple Gasworks, Glasgow - September 2014



Limerick_Student

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#1
Temple Gasworks was built 1871 for the Partick, Hillhead and Maryhill Gas Co, and purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1891. Now used for storage only, there are two three-lift gasholders still remaining on site. The Dawsholm gasworks which this site was associated with has long since been demolished. All that remains of this site now is a fenced off tunnel which once connected the two sites.

The gasometer built in 1893 measures 240ft [73.1m] in diameter and has a capacity of 5,000,000 cubic ft, the other gasometer built in 1900 measures 220ft [67.1m] in diameter and has a capacity of 4,000,000 cubic ft. When under construction, this was considered the second largest gasworks in Britain.

Nowadays the compound lies empty and unused with the two ancient gasometers slowly rusting away in the harsh Scottish weather.

Only having 9ish hours of darkness available to us on our one night in Glasgow, myself and Stellaluna started this one a bit earlier than we would have liked. Due to this there was still some activity near our entry point. Once things calmed down a bit we went for it and were soon dropping into the gasworks compound.

All of the photos we'd seen from here were from the gasometer built in 1893 so we decided to climb the gasometer built in 1900 for a different view. The stairs were in a reasonably good condition but the final ladder to the top level has seen better days. Luckily there were dual rungs the whole way up so if one gave way you had the other as a backup. It's hard to know whether the ladders themselves are over one hundred years old or if they were replaced later but it wouldn't surprise me if the final ladder is still the original one.

#1 - Arriving at the base of the 1900 gasometer
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#2 - A view of the 1893 gasometer with the rest of the gasworks compound visible below
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#3 - The view from the second level
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#4
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#5 - Stellaluna descending back down the final ladder
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#6 - The view from the top level
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#7
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#8
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Limerick_Student

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#4
Cheers lads. I did a quick check and saw most of the other gasometer reports were in here so went with that even though the climb isn't necessarily that high. It can be moved to Industrial though if it's better suited there, I don't mind either way :)
 

slayaaaa

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#8
Liking the long exposures mate. There's couple of listed Gasometers in Chelmsford, might get along and do some long exposures of them sometime. Thanks for sharing. :thumb
 

Limerick_Student

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#10
"slayaaaa" said:
Liking the long exposures mate. There's couple of listed Gasometers in Chelmsford, might get along and do some long exposures of them sometime. Thanks for sharing.:thumb
Cheers, I'd definitely recommend it, they're pretty awesome structures. We don't have any of them left here in Ireland so I had to try and make sure to fit one into this trip.

Nice ones mate :thumb

Surprised anythings left TBH, especially in Maryhill area :)

These look like they"re made out of Twiglets :D
Cheers man! I hadn't realised it was in a dodgy area, all the parts of Glasgow I passed through seemed grand but then again I grew up in Limerick so I probably wouldn't notice :D Ha, agreed, I'm surprised the last ladder is still standing!

[QUOTE="Blinker" ]Did you find it really oily up there?[/QUOTE]

Also, finally made sense of that. Wrong spot mate ;) That one is a just a tad higher.
 
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