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Tips for a new photographer | Photography and Video Forum | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Tips for a new photographer


TheUrbanFox

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
So just brought home today my first proper camera, a Canon EOS 4000D which was recommended to me by a friend for decent picture/video qualities. Just wondering if any people out there have any tips, no matter how minor, for a first timer. I literally mean anything relevant, as my family say no knowledge is bad knowledge if used right, and I'd like my first set of pictures to be good when I get round to it (Planning on visiting the Great Northern Railway Warehouse in Nottingham.)

Thanks in advance! :D
 

Pammyj

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
This is what I use at the moment, and is my first camera. First tip is get a tripod, until then use it depending on what your taking. E.g portrait for people, nature for close up flowers, sports for action shots etc. When you get a tripod, then you can start setting your own settings, and apertures. No point messing about with those until you have a tripod. Also, and I’ve still to get this, get some sort of editing software. When you start setting apertures etc you can take merge your shots to get the best image. Also get a wide angled lens, great for getting full rooms in.
Hope this helps
 

TheUrbanFox

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
This is what I use at the moment, and is my first camera. First tip is get a tripod, until then use it depending on what your taking. E.g portrait for people, nature for close up flowers, sports for action shots etc. When you get a tripod, then you can start setting your own settings, and apertures. No point messing about with those until you have a tripod. Also, and I’ve still to get this, get some sort of editing software. When you start setting apertures etc you can take merge your shots to get the best image. Also get a wide angled lens, great for getting full rooms in.
Hope this helps
I've ordered a tripod, SD card and carry case which will all be arriving on Monday thankfully, looked at a few wide angled lenses and hopefully will be able to pick one up soonish :D As for editing software I do have Photoshop C6 since it was the only one that you could buy outright (hate "renting" software...) could that possibly work? I think my main concern is learning my camera which hopefully I'll find some nice guides and such :)
 

Pammyj

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
I've ordered a tripod, SD card and carry case which will all be arriving on Monday thankfully, looked at a few wide angled lenses and hopefully will be able to pick one up soonish :D As for editing software I do have Photoshop C6 since it was the only one that you could buy outright (hate "renting" software...) could that possibly work? I think my main concern is learning my camera which hopefully I'll find some nice guides and such :)
I’ve never tried editing yet, it’s all new to me. I’ve been recommended lightroom though.
 

HughieD

28DL Regular User
Regular User
Invest in a decent tripod (as @Pammyj just said). Get a decent torch too. By the very nature of this hobby you will need to get decent results in low light (and sometimes no light) situations.
 

pirate

Rum Swigger
Regular User
Go and buy yourself a “beginners photography” book or read some guides on the net.....they will have pics and explain better than we can on here.

Start by using auto settings and getting your framing right.....composing pic properly.........then start worrying about fiddling with settings
 

host

28DL Regular User
Regular User
Like most will say good tripod torch half decent camera. I also have small first aid kit. My advice is don’t go exploring and expect to get amazing shots straight away, practice at home shooting your rooms at night no lights on. Bright sunshine blasting through windows shoot room and expose for window and edit them together. Composition is Key and patience. Good luck but most of all a good friend to go with and have fun.
 

VC1

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Don't get hung up about kit, photographers can be terrible kit freaks.....
For UE photography, a tripod - so you can do long exposures.
Work out how to shoot manually & expose for flash.

But don't worry, shooting digital is childs play next to film & you get as many goes as you want....
 

Riddler118

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
A decent camera bag is a must.
You dont want your camera swinging around your neck when climbing walls etc.
Start to learn the exposure triangle and how it affects your image.
A tripod becomes a ball ache when exploring in my experience unless you are planning to light paint or run long exposures.
I would go with an off camera flash and set of triggers meaning you can bounce the light off the ceiling.
The only reason I explore is for the photo oppertunitys
 

Hyde

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
I’d recommend getting a light attachment for the camera as sometimes it’s hard to get decent shots if the area you’re in is dark.
I use a “Neewer on camera video light photo with Dimmable 176 LED Panel”. Just be aware when you’re using one if the site has a lot of security, as they might see the light and become aware of your presence.
 

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