Web
Analytics
Report - - Willingham Manor Cambs Jul 18 | Residential Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Willingham Manor Cambs Jul 18


Bikin Glynn

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Been covered on here a few times recently so thought I would share my version

Did a really quick visit here one Sat afternoon but was not long enough as it happened as it took me 40 min to get there, so a return visit with hounddog who is ever enthusiastic when abandoned cars are involved was hastily arranged for one eve.

I like this place, its pretty relaxed although on the second visit there were 2 military helicopters so low over us for half hour that we were convinced they were using us for thermal image training!
The house itself is just a shell reportedly to of burnt down in the 40s or 50s which would tie in with date of the cars, but I have no furthur history on this.
The garden however does have some interesting stuff.
The cars in case u were wondering are all Austin 16's

I was particularly interested in the half a dozen "torpedo like" objects, which I have been reliably informed were aircraft drop tanks










































 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Some lovely close ups there, Interesting stuff. I like that tram/train thing, very photogenic.

Just one or two little observations, your title is not complete and I think the IMG- tags will wreak havoc with @Ojay standards lol. But nice photos. :thumb
 

Bikin Glynn

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Some lovely close ups there, Interesting stuff. I like that tram/train thing, very photogenic.

Just one or two little observations, your title is not complete and I think the IMG- tags will wreak havoc with @Ojay standards lol. But nice photos. :thumb
Should be ok now, Im not sure how to remove them when posting so I post then quickly edit to remove them. U must of been really quick getting in with a reply.
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Should be ok now, Im not sure how to remove them when posting so I post then quickly edit to remove them. U must of been really quick getting in with a reply.
Since the changes, I get notifications when a new post goes up, I love looking at as many as I can. Yep Im on most of the free time I have. Just been sick for 10 mths, but back on form now. Yep looks all sorted now :cool:
 

mockney reject

Horrendous exploring cunt......
Regular User
Did you manages ot find any info on this place? I visited it a while back but never reported it as it lacked history

The cars are old Austins IIRC

nice pics :)
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Did you manages ot find any info on this place? I visited it a while back but never reported it as it lacked history

The cars are old Austins IIRC

nice pics :)
Just a small bit I found :

In 1066 Ely's WILLINGHAM manor was assessed at 7 of the 7½ hides there, the remainder being divided between a tenant and sokeland of the abbey. On the creation of the diocese of Ely in 1109, the manor became part of the bishop's portio, and was held by his successors for the next five centuries. By 1600 the land was mostly alienated and the manor comprised little more than quitrents and manorial rights, some of which were difficult to enforce.
In 1599 Bishop Heton conceded the manor to the queen, who sold it in 1601 to Miles Sandys.
Sandys and his son and namesake conveyed it in 1626 to Thomas Parke , perhaps as an indirect marriage settlement for his daughter and heir Elizabeth and the younger Sandys , who possessed it by 1631. Heavily in debt, Sandys conveyed the manor in 1649 or 1650 to trustees, one of whom, Richard Holman, became sole owner between 1664 and 1668. By will proved 1678 Holman gave it to his son and namesake.
John Holman by will provedit in 1689 to his nephew John Brownell. Brownell, of age in 1691, was lord until 1735. He was later said to have shot himself, leaving the manor to his steward Dingley Askham. Askham, probably gave it with his younger daughter Harriet on her marriage in 1752 to Sir Thomas Hatton, Bt., of Long Stanton. Hatton (d. 1787) was succeeded in turn by his sons Sir John (d. 1811) and Sir Thomas Dingley Hatton (d. 1812), the latter's heirs being his six sisters. On the partition of their estate c. 1816, Willingham fell to Elizabeth Ann Hatton, under whose will, proved 1845, it passed with the reunited Hatton estate in Long Stanton to a distant relative, Daniel Heneage Finch-Hatton (d. 1866). The manorial rights descended in turn to his sons Edward Hatton Finch-Hatton (d. 1887) and William Robert (d. 1909), then to the latter's sons George Daniel (d. 1921) and Nigel Montagu Finch-Hatton, who in 1922 sold them to W. H. Francis (d. 1940). The latter's son W. M. Francis died in 1970 and in 1973 the lordship was sold by his heirs to Mr. R. B. Johns, who retained it in 1982.

Mr R B Johns seems to be the last owner of the manor. The manor stands in 50 arces of land.
 

Similar threads


Top