Web
Analytics
Report - - Wolsingham Train Depot, Durham - Dec 2020 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Wolsingham Train Depot, Durham - Dec 2020


UrbandonedTeam

the north
Regular User
Wolsingham Train Depot



Taken from the window of the also abandoned Wolsingham steelworks offices.

The history of this place is quite fascinating and we only found out how historic the property is after visiting.

Charles Attwood founded an iron works in Wolsingham and patented a new method of steelmaking. The Ironworks were a major employer in Wolsingham from 1864, producing steel from Weardale iron ore. When Charles Attwood died his nephew took over the company and traded as John Rogerson & Co until 1930. Steel castings were produced for use in both shipbuilding and munitions. The firm made a major contribution to the war effort in both World Wars. Electric arc furnaces were installed around 1950 but trade declined and the works closed in 1984. Manufacture continued for a time on a smaller scale run by a workers cooperative. It appears that the train depot was built during the steelworks period of use, as a building without that purpose. It may have been converted as the factory grew in size and a railway was necessary, but it's final use was a train depot. The ironworks finally closed in 2008 and was demolished, leaving some offices on the roadside behind and the transport shed.




We had seen this one online as another 'secret spot' and had reason to believe it was up north. It did take a while with minimal externals, but one Winter night, I spent a good few hours tracking it down and wanted to go right away. It didn't seem like the sort of place that would remain lacking in vandalism in the UK, and also was quite special. Before the lockdown, we headed up there for sunrise and everything went swimmingly, spending way too long inside for the open space available. Visited with @jtza .





Immediately inside, you can see why this place is out of the ordinary. Not taking away from the 60s-80s trains, the building itself is very dated and contains some nice architecture.

The blue Mark 2 car that snaked over the two lanes in the shed.







The front cabin of the Mark 2, beside an old brake van.



Inside the Mark 2.





Mail compartment.



Cabin.





Further up the train, it began to get slightly more stripped and decayed. The buffet car was difficult to walk through with seats and cushions piled on the floor.







Heading towards the red Mark 1 at the north end of the shed. We were very intrigued to see what lay inside this one, due to the first class signs on every window and the older style of design.







A private booth inside. Sadly, this older carriage was only one car long.









Note the decorative throws on each seat and the ornate light fittings.



To be continued.
 

UrbandonedTeam

the north
Regular User
Following a look inside each train that wasn't freight, the rest of our time here was spent on the various gantry walkways that run parallel all the way along the tracks as well as on the roof of the trains. The two options definitely gave the best view of the site.















A little wholesome picture to finish with.

Here is the link to our documentary styled video filmed at the transport shed. We cover the building's past, present and future through cinematics and narration:

https://youtu.be/6o0smjGAAao

Thanks for reading :)
 

KPUrban_

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Lovely stuff dude, adore the old BR MK2 coaches as well as the Anglia DBSO. Nicely covered.
 
Last edited:

jxck.urbex

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
A geniune dream location, loving the pictures too! Anyone free for a lift? :rolleyes: :Not Worthy
 

obscurity

Flaxenation of the G!!!
Regular User
Wow that's nice. Don't often see thing slike this in the UK these days.
 

westernsultan

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
This is the preserved Weardale railway which has seen a number of owners over recent years - see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weardale_Railway - The intention has been to run specific trains, like the Polar Express, rather than a timetable, To do this the line will require a push pull action with a locomotive at one end and the likes of DBSO 9711 at the other end. Your pictures show 9711, a Mark II Driving Brake Standard Open (DBSO) in storage at RMS Locotec, Wolsingham along with other carriages needed for such a train. 9711 was rebuilt from Brake Standard Open (BSO) 9532, and carries former Anglia livery. This spent many years stored at Tyseley Museum, in Birmingham and Crewe heritage Centre before moving to Wolsingham. The Covid 19 and lockdown has prevented the current ambitions getting very far. The railway has a new depot nearby and what is to happen to this old building is yet to be decided, but you might like the info at https://www.weardale-railway.org.uk/wolsingham-station It is a listed building known as The Gunbarrel shed. It is not a railway depot. Old article at https://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/9196728.heritage-railway-starts-work-tourist-attraction/
 
Last edited:

Speed

Got Epic?
Regular User
Used to be a pretty epic steelworks there.. :(


 

Mikeymutt

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Nice set there. I visited here in the summer as you know. It's a beautiful place though for sure. I did not post any on forums though.
 

dave

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Great report btw. I did wander into one of the out buildings of the old steelworks many years ago the Weardale railway was in its early days then.
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Cracking report. Lovely to see those old carriages & the 1st class detail. What a beauty to explore. Yes to trains, yes to 1st class trains:thumb
 

Similar threads


Top