Report - Wolverhampton & Midland Counties Eye Infirmary

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the invisableman

Sac magic
28DL Full Member
May 9, 2010
A pleasant solo explore which im now starting enjoy doing having overcome my initial fears.

History and original image taken from

The original Infirmary was designed by the architect T H Fleeming (1849‑1935) whose works also include Barclays Bank, Lichfield Street (1876), the College of Adult Education, Old Hall Street (1899) and the late 19th century spire of St. Jude's Church, Tettenhall Road (itself built in 1867‑9), all of which are Grade II Statutorily Listed Buildings, and the former Higher Grade School, Newhampton Road which is on the Council's Local List.

The Infirmary was built by Wolverhampton builders Henry Willcock & Co. at a cost of £13,000 and opened in 1888, providing three men's and three women's wards with thirty beds and five children's cots. A significant part of the cost was met by local philanthropist, Philip Horsman, who also donated the Art Gallery to the town and whose benefaction is commemorated in the Fountain in St. Peter's Gardens.

It is constructed of red brick with elaborate brick details and stone dressings. It is built to an irregular plan in a simple Gothic style under a plain clay tiled roof with crested ridge tiles and two spired turrets, one of which has an inscribed stone plaque bearing the legend: "EYE INFIRMARY AD 1887. Some of the original sash windows have been replaced and late 20th century extensions to the original west front have detracted from the character and appearance of the original building.

The infirmary as it was originally, from a postcard of about 1900

Anyway on with the pics











Thanks for looking :thumb


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