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Report - - Wolves Eye Infirmary - Sept 2011 | Asylums and Hospitals | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - Wolves Eye Infirmary - Sept 2011

Gh0sT

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#1
Visited with the invisableman

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The original Infirmary was designed by the architect T H Fleeming (1849‑1935) whose works also include Barclays Bank, Lichfield Street (1876), the College of Adult Education, Old Hall Street (1899) and the late 19th century spire of St. Jude's Church, Tettenhall Road (itself built in 1867‑9), all of which are Grade II Statutorily Listed Buildings, and the former Higher Grade School, Newhampton Road which is on the Council's Local List.

The Infirmary was built by Wolverhampton builders Henry Willcock & Co. at a cost of £13,000 and opened in 1888, providing three men's and three women's wards with thirty beds and five children's cots. A significant part of the cost was met by local philanthropist, Philip Horsman, who also donated the Art Gallery to the town and whose benefaction is commemorated in the Fountain in St. Peter's Gardens.

It is constructed of red brick with elaborate brick details and stone dressings. It is built to an irregular plan in a simple Gothic style under a plain clay tiled roof with crested ridge tiles and two spired turrets, one of which has an inscribed stone plaque bearing the legend: "EYE INFIRMARY AD 1887. Some of the original sash windows have been replaced and late 20th century extensions to the original west front have detracted from the character and appearance of the original building.

The visit - This was second on my list of the day and boy did it disappoint. I didn't really know what to expect and had a my hopes up that i may see some interesting stuff. Once inside i didn't expect it to be quite as bad as it is. I apologize for my shots, trust me, this place was as inspiring as the stale sandwich i'd purchased from Corby services earlier that morning.

The pictures :

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By this point the 20+ hours i had been awake was starting to take it's toll - We'd had a comical but brief encounter with some Larish Pikeys stripping the Rads on the upper floors and decided we liked our camera equipment too much - the rewards didnt warrant the potential risk so we dodged the endless amount of sharps in the grounds and made our exit.


As always thanks for Looking :thumb
 

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