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Report - - Woolton Quarry Tunnel Liverpool Jan 2012 | Mines and Quarries | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Woolton Quarry Tunnel Liverpool Jan 2012



kevsy21

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#1
Woolton Quarries History
Quarrying in Woolton has taken place in a number of locations: School Lane, Quarry Street and Woolton Hill Road, from where stone was taken for some of Woolton’s finest buildings.
The quarries know as North and South Quarries produced sandstone, most famously latterly for the Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. Quarrying in a major way dates from the early 1800s, with the name of James Rose figuring large, and many local buildings were built in the local stone. When work on the Anglican cathedral was officially finished, the North quarry closed soon after in 1978.
Just a few buildings made from Woolton stone include Woolton Hall, Stoneleigh, Beaconsfield and Gateacre Grange. There are other quarrying locations as well, notably adjacent to Reynolds Park, in Woolton Hill Road.
Whereas most sources say that the 'Quarrymen' were named after John Lennon's school. Original member Peter Shotton says that a reason they chose that name is because of the massive stone Quarry in Woolton, situated off Quarry Street. Pete said, "Since our native Woolton was pocked with sandstone quarries, and most of us attended Quarry Bank School, The Quarrymen seemed as good a choice as any." So in that sense, living in the shadow of the quarry, they were also 'Quarrymen'.

The area of the north quarry has now been naturally colonised with an extensive array of flora and fauna. In the past 40 years it has been made available at special request for botanical and archaeological research purposes but sadly due to its steep, sheer sides, it is not open to public access.

Having known of the tunnel for a few years, we finally went to check it out whilst in the area.

We had good fun going down the steep slope to the tunnel on a cold frosty morning. Once we entered the tunnel it felt quite humid. It gave a real feeling of stepping into local history and the hard graft undertaken to create it. Even though it’s not long due to it being blocked off it does make you curious to where it leads to, maybe to the other quarry?
Explored With Georgie.
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The part where the tunnel has been blocked off.
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Lots of this loops line the tunnel
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Georgie
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Near the entrance is this strange arrangement of stones.
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Thanks for looking.​
 
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