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Report - - Yalding Agrochemical Laboratory - Kent - Sept 2019 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Yalding Agrochemical Laboratory - Kent - Sept 2019


UkMorlin

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Hello, my name is Will, i am a 16 year old from the South Eaast of England.

There is literally nothing online about this place, i have spent hours trying to find details.
I know that this place was an agrochemical laboratory owned by a sweedish company called syngenta. It closed down in late 2003 and will probably be turned into houses soon.
I found one news report with more details.
https://www.kentonline.co.uk/kent/news/company-axes-225-jobs-a69/

There are now 3 buildings left on the site and i have gotten into all of them, there are two attached to each other, one is a smaller loading bay which is a pain to access (this includes crawling through an exterior hole on the second floor which is just a bit smaller than a piece of a3 paper). It is also infested with pigeons but is still a laugh. The other main part are offices and archives. This one is pigeon free. There is also roof access. There were a few ways of getting into it but it changes weekly, people (not me) rip down barricades and then they get patched up by security. So it is a risk wether you can get in or not.

The smaller building has asbestos issues so i wouldn't recommend getting into it, or at least wear a mask.

There is also security about 2 miles from the site but are no alarms that i am aware of.
I did get into the main site over a year ago and do want to go back for better photographs so sorry if the photos are poor, they will hopefully be updated soon (they are also on my phone so will put them up soon - wanted to get the post up ASAP). I did go back a few months ago but the access point was boarded up. (I could have ripped it down but i consider myself an urban explorer and not a vandal).
To be honest its not hard to find, just use google maps anywhere balding and you will see it.
You might even be able to get permission to get in, but where is the fun in that ;)
If you do, contact prestige guarding ltd at Yalding.



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Once again sorry about the blurriness, i will update the phots later.
Hope you enjoyed.
 
Last edited:

Yorrick

I call bullshit!
Regular User
I don't recall seeing this before, not a bad find.
There is literally nothing online about this place, i have spent hours trying to find details.
There's not loads, but I did find this -
"1912 Chiswick Soft Soap and Polish Company
1914 Yalding Manufacturing Company Ltd
1921 McDougall and Yalding Ltd
1927 Cooper, McDougall and Robertson Ltd
1937 Plant Protection Ltd
1964 ICI Agricultural Division
1975 ICI Plant Protection Division
1987 ICI Agrochemicals
1993 Zeneca
2001 Syngenta
2003 Company Closed.

The Yalding works can truly be considered the source and origin of agricultural chemicals since a factory producing crop protection products had been established on this site for just over ninety years. Interest in crop protection developed when the effectiveness of soft soap in controlling aphids on hops was discovered.

A major producer of soaps, the Chiswick Polish Company, perceived an opportunity for development, and in 1912 purchased a triangular site at Yalding (No 7 site) which was well served by road, rail and river, on which they built a factory for the manufacture of soft soap.

In 1914, the Chiswick Polish Co Ltd sold out to a consortium consisting mainly of local fruit and hop growers, and became known as the Yalding Manufacturing Co Ltd. This was established to continue manufacture of their well known Imperial Brand Soft Soap, and to extend their range to include fruit and hop washes, fungicides and insecticides.

Then, following the discovery by Professor Ian McDougall of McDougall Bros of Manchester of the insecticidal properties of derris, the Yalding factory merged with McDougall in 1921 to become McDougall and Yalding Ltd.

Finally three firms, William Cooper and Nephews of Berkhamstead, McDougall Bros of Manchester, and Robertson of Oban, who up to this time had been largely involved in animal health products, were brought into the crop protection field following the discovery that copper compounds used in sheep dips were also effective as general fungicides, particularly against potato blight.

This resulted in a series of amalgamations and in 1927 the firms of McDougall and Robertson, William Cooper and Nephews, McDougall and Yalding Ltd, Tomlinson and Hayward Ltd and Abol Ltd merged to form Cooper, McDougall and Robertson LTD.

In the following years, ICI was also beginning to develop interests in crop protection chemicals, which were conflicting with those of Cooper, McDougall and Robertson Ltd. In June 1937 these interests were merged in a new company, Plant Protection Ltd. At this stage the manufacturing side, including the factory at Yalding came under the control of ICI Dyestuffs Division. This responsibility eventually transferred to ICI General Chemicals Division (subsequently Mond Division) who had become heavily involved in the manufacture both of active ingredients and of formulations such as 'Perenox'.

In 1964 ICI decided to merge its crop production and crop protection interests and Plant Protection Ltd became part of ICI Agricultural Division. Finally, in 1987, following acquisition of the Stauffer Chemical Company, and in keeping with the ICI corporate image campaign, the name Plant Protection disappeared and the company then operated globally as ICI AGROCHEMICALS.

In June 1993 the ICI name was replaced by Zeneca when the company separated from its parent to become a leading bioscience company.

In November 2000, the agribusinesses of AstraZeneca and Novartis were changed to become part of the Swiss company Syngenta. Less than a year later in August 2001, the closure of the company was announced, which finally happened in December 2003."
 
Last edited:

Yorrick

I call bullshit!
Regular User
Document mentions Yalding site as far back as 1906
No it doesn't. Read it again.

1906: launch of Cherry Blossom Boot Polish, which under imaginative marketing, became a huge success and ultimately led to the formation (in 1913) of a separate company under the name Chiswick Polish Company Ltd and the transfer of the soap manufacturing operations to Yalding in Kent.
 

westernsultan

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
No it doesn't. Read it again.

1906: launch of Cherry Blossom Boot Polish, which under imaginative marketing, became a huge success and ultimately led to the formation (in 1913) of a separate company under the name Chiswick Polish Company Ltd and the transfer of the soap manufacturing operations to Yalding in Kent.
You are absolutely right - I did read it correctly but in my attempt to direct readers to the 1906 paragraph the text I uploaded was poorly written. No excuses - I should have read my text again. Thanks for clarifying the point
 

UkMorlin

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
I don't recall seeing this before, not a bad find.

There's not loads, but I did find this -
"1912 Chiswick Soft Soap and Polish Company
1914 Yalding Manufacturing Company Ltd
1921 McDougall and Yalding Ltd
1927 Cooper, McDougall and Robertson Ltd
1937 Plant Protection Ltd
1964 ICI Agricultural Division
1975 ICI Plant Protection Division
1987 ICI Agrochemicals
1993 Zeneca
2001 Syngenta
2003 Company Closed.

The Yalding works can truly be considered the source and origin of agricultural chemicals since a factory producing crop protection products had been established on this site for just over ninety years. Interest in crop protection developed when the effectiveness of soft soap in controlling aphids on hops was discovered.

A major producer of soaps, the Chiswick Polish Company, perceived an opportunity for development, and in 1912 purchased a triangular site at Yalding (No 7 site) which was well served by road, rail and river, on which they built a factory for the manufacture of soft soap.

In 1914, the Chiswick Polish Co Ltd sold out to a consortium consisting mainly of local fruit and hop growers, and became known as the Yalding Manufacturing Co Ltd. This was established to continue manufacture of their well known Imperial Brand Soft Soap, and to extend their range to include fruit and hop washes, fungicides and insecticides.

Then, following the discovery by Professor Ian McDougall of McDougall Bros of Manchester of the insecticidal properties of derris, the Yalding factory merged with McDougall in 1921 to become McDougall and Yalding Ltd.

Finally three firms, William Cooper and Nephews of Berkhamstead, McDougall Bros of Manchester, and Robertson of Oban, who up to this time had been largely involved in animal health products, were brought into the crop protection field following the discovery that copper compounds used in sheep dips were also effective as general fungicides, particularly against potato blight.

This resulted in a series of amalgamations and in 1927 the firms of McDougall and Robertson, William Cooper and Nephews, McDougall and Yalding Ltd, Tomlinson and Hayward Ltd and Abol Ltd merged to form Cooper, McDougall and Robertson LTD.

In the following years, ICI was also beginning to develop interests in crop protection chemicals, which were conflicting with those of Cooper, McDougall and Robertson Ltd. In June 1937 these interests were merged in a new company, Plant Protection Ltd. At this stage the manufacturing side, including the factory at Yalding came under the control of ICI Dyestuffs Division. This responsibility eventually transferred to ICI General Chemicals Division (subsequently Mond Division) who had become heavily involved in the manufacture both of active ingredients and of formulations such as 'Perenox'.

In 1964 ICI decided to merge its crop production and crop protection interests and Plant Protection Ltd became part of ICI Agricultural Division. Finally, in 1987, following acquisition of the Stauffer Chemical Company, and in keeping with the ICI corporate image campaign, the name Plant Protection disappeared and the company then operated globally as ICI AGROCHEMICALS.

In June 1993 the ICI name was replaced by Zeneca when the company separated from its parent to become a leading bioscience company.

In November 2000, the agribusinesses of AstraZeneca and Novartis were changed to become part of the Swiss company Syngenta. Less than a year later in August 2001, the closure of the company was announced, which finally happened in December 2003."
This is amazing, on google earth pro, you can turn back the time and see up to 1940 i think. It is amazing to see what they were.
 

obscurity

Flaxenation of the G!!!
Regular User
well done on bringing something new to the forums. Just goes to show theres always things to find despite so many arguing that its impossible and just following the crowd. I am a kent based member and have never seen this before :thumb
 

UkMorlin

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
well done on bringing something new to the forums. Just goes to show theres always things to find despite so many arguing that its impossible and just following the crowd. I am a kent based member and have never seen this before :thumb
go have a look, its easy to find but a pain in the ass to get in, i know a load of other places around me which i will post later if you are interested
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
go have a look, its easy to find but a pain in the ass to get in, i know a load of other places around me which i will post later if you are interested
I well may check this out, I love a new place. I dont post all my explores as a lot of members dont, but love the challenge, mooch etc
 

callumawhitehead

28DL Member
28DL Member
Hello,
Came across this post the other day and went to the site. From what we can tell it’s currently used to store industrial/construction equipment and part of the main building is used for dog training (perhaps used to as its very dusty inside the training room). Whoever owns the site clearly doesn’t want anyone inside as the building is very difficult to get inside, so much so we had to give up on finding a route in.
 

UkMorlin

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Hello,
Came across this post the other day and went to the site. From what we can tell it’s currently used to store industrial/construction equipment and part of the main building is used for dog training (perhaps used to as its very dusty inside the training room). Whoever owns the site clearly doesn’t want anyone inside as the building is very difficult to get inside, so much so we had to give up on finding a route in.
i had a similar issue, haven't been in a couple of months.
 

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