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Report - - Gannex, Broadlea mills, Elland, Yorkshire 03/10 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - Gannex, Broadlea mills, Elland, Yorkshire 03/10

bungle666

....king of snake........
28DL Full Member
#1
Visited with Bigjobs and AndyJ.

wikipedia said:
Gannex is a waterproof fabric invented in 1951 by Joseph Kagan, a British industrialist and the founder of Kagan Textiles, of Elland, which made raincoats. Gannex raincoats were most famously worn by Prime Minister Harold Wilson.

After Wilson, then the opposition trade spokesman, wore a Gannex coat on a world tour in 1956, the raincoats became fashion icons, and were worn by world leaders such as Lyndon Johnson, Mao Zedong, and Nikita Khrushchev, as well as by Queen Elizabeth, the Duke of Edinburgh, and the royal corgis. In addition they were worn by Arctic and Antarctic explorers, Himalayan climbers, the armed services, and police forces in Britain and Canada. The success of the new fabric made Kagan a multi-millionaire.
the gannex material was once called "the savior of the yorkshire textile industry" and the kagan textiles site (broadlea and marshfield mills over the road) were once Ellands biggest employer. gannex was produced here till sometime in the 80s and broadlea mill was used for industrial units before the kagan family sold the site to the property developer clayton homes, who allready owned the marshfield mill site over the road.

a multitude of uses have been put forward for the site, including a new asda and bus station (2001/2) and later a conversion to flats and office / retail space. the owner (clayton homes) went into administration in august 2009 and the site is now in the ownership of pennine housing, who are debating what to do with the site next.

on the surface this place looks knackered, but there are some gems inside to those patient enough to persevere, including 100s of gannex coat patterns.......

pics.

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Turned out to be a good day on the whole, with another one ticked off the list!!

B..
 

Attachments

Bigjobs

Official Smartarse
Regular User
#2
Very interesting! Not trying to get away from what the picture depicts but the graffiti "instant hernia" is pretty funny considering the fact that it almost looks like shutting that heavy door would actually give one.
When you're there it looks like it was put there by an employee regarding moving the door itslef.

Mine

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to get that shat, meant climbing up this
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and that was the better of the two :D

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Attachments

T

the plumber

Guest
Guest
#3
Visited with Bigjobs and AndyJ.



the gannex material was once called "the savior of the yorkshire textile industry" and the kagan textiles site (broadlea and marshfield mills over the road) were once Ellands biggest employer. gannex was produced here till sometime in the 80s and broadlea mill was used for industrial units before the kagan family sold the site to the property developer clayton homes, who allready owned the marshfield mill site over the road.

a multitude of uses have been put forward for the site, including a new asda and bus station (2001/2) and later a conversion to flats and office / retail space. the owner (clayton homes) went into administration in august 2009 and the site is now in the ownership of pennine housing, who are debating what to do with the site next.

on the surface this place looks knackered, but there are some gems inside to those patient enough to persevere, including 100s of gannex coat patterns.......

pics.

DSC_5424.jpg


DSC_5425.jpg


DSC_5426.jpg


DSC_5428.jpg


DSC_5436.jpg


DSC_5437.jpg


DSC_5438.jpg


DSC_5439.jpg


DSC_5441.jpg


DSC_5444.jpg


DSC_5447.jpg


DSC_5452.jpg


DSC_5453.jpg


DSC_5460.jpg


DSC_5466.jpg


DSC_5476.jpg


DSC_5477.jpg


DSC_5482.jpg


DSC_5484.jpg


Turned out to be a good day on the whole, with another one ticked off the list!!

B..
During the 1939/45 war after the bombing of Bradford the Mill was used for the storage of wool. This was then supplied to manufacturers for uniforms etc for the armed forces. For a short time Crossleys mill was also used. My father John Wilson Kelley was the manager. After leaving Elland Grammer School i started my working life there. The office girl was Miss Jessie Brook who lived in one of the street above the Town Hall picture house. I still have a Gannex coat. Ralph Kelley
 

Attachments

Bigjobs

Official Smartarse
Regular User
#6
I had an email from a journo about it, they said that demo had started, wanting to do a piece on the history of the place, but I've actually no idea as I didn't bother replying to it.
 

host

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#7
Just got back from doing this ,it is well and truly bare inside and they have started to demo it at on e end wont last long...
 

host

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#9
FFS :( Cheers host, i only drove past 3 week ago and there was NO indication of impending demo :(:(:(:(:(

B..
Putting a tribute report up tomorrow, i was surprised as well luckily i only came from manchester but it was still worth it..
 

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